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Found 1 result

  1. We had a brief discussion about coaxial SPDIF switches >> here <<. My experimental board got finally put together, and I have been testing it since a few days, with my 930, 940 and JA20 hooked up. I have attached the project files [projectfiles.zip] for those who want to build their own. The schematic is very simple, and can easily be developed further, like when someone needs more inputs, or wants to change channels with push buttons or IR remote instead, etc. Components cost about 12 Euro, plus the "soapbox", that is just a cheap small project box, to protect the board. I did not feel making a fancy techno looking chassis, even the rotating knob is from a salvaged 510S. The device has three SPDIF inputs and one SPDIF output (that is galvanically isolated, to avoid ground loops). It works from a 5...6V DC adapter. One LED is lit when the box is powered up, three others are lit respectively to the actually selected input channel, also matched by the position of the rotary switch (*). I chose a 4 throw switch, and used the leftmost position for muting the output (only the power on led is lit) - can be handy when swapping cables, for example. (*) One comment on the board: depending on the actual rotary switch model, switching order can be different. I had to tinker the board after it turned out, that the switch I bought worked the opposite way. In practice it meant I had to swap the connections of LED1/LED3 to pin C2/C4, also, ground pin B4 instead of B2.