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Christopher

Radio Shack Volume Attenuator

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i just just bought one of these at radioshack. when i was practicing with my stereo turned up really loud, mic sens low, the attenuator on max, i had to turn the gain up to 20/30 to get a good volume, but i don't think it distorted. :ok:

there are 2 instores today that i will definately record and maybe a concert later tonight!

the crucial show i really want a good recording of is on monday, so hopefully i will have had enough expierience with it by then.

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WOW what a difference :ok: !! I used the Atten this morning to record worship and it REALLY cleaned it up B) !! I will try to post a before and after set of clips later tonight as I had just enough time to take a listen to a little but not edit and down load this mornings service.

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Here is a song from Sunday`s service and with the RS Atten in the signal path. WHAT A DIFFERENCE :good::ok: !!

Here is a song from Sunday`s service and with the RS Atten in the signal path. Listen to this and the clip from before WHAT A DIFFERENCE :good::ok: !! THANK FOR THE TIP GUYS :ok: !!

3_26_06_My_God_COC_W__RH.mp3

Edited by Shreadhead

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Ok, I just bought one of these Rat Shack attenuator controls - which will be my temporary solution for my mics until i get a BattBox.

My question is that, Can i run this Rat Shack Attenuator cable between the Soundboard and my Hi-MD?

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Ok, I just bought one of these Rat Shack attenuator controls - which will be my temporary solution for my mics until i get a BattBox.

My question is that, Can i run this Rat Shack Attenuator cable between the Soundboard and my Hi-MD?

I recorded once with out the RS Attenuator on a soundboard and it clipped really bad. I wasn't able to monitor the recording so I didn't know it clipped, I had the recording levels on manual and turned really far down, but it still clipped! A few months later after buying one I used it with a soundboard and it worked wonderfully. I'm going to be using it this weekend again, Ill post the results.

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I recorded once with out the RS Attenuator on a soundboard and it clipped really bad. I wasn't able to monitor the recording so I didn't know it clipped, I had the recording levels on manual and turned really far down, but it still clipped! A few months later after buying one I used it with a soundboard and it worked wonderfully. I'm going to be using it this weekend again, Ill post the results.

Use the line-in when recording from a soundboard.

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Helloes to you alls, from down south looking forward to a recording up north. :)

Just a quick simple question:

Is this the same thing everyone is talking about?

On Amazon

41dBm9E4UuL._SS500_.jpg

Thanks a lot in advance...

Edited by canito_40

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That should work.

The one in my signature is the Radio Shack version, and I've tried also tried a Maplin VC-1 from England, but any headphone volume control should work. The Shure might even be better made.

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Wow. I'm really glad I discovered this topic.

I've been recording with a Sony MZ-R37. I got it, and the Sound Professionals in-ear binaural stereo mics, and a battery module with bass roll-off, just so I could bootleg live sets by one of my favourite local bands. So far, every recording I've made has been distorted. First, I thought it was because I had the auto-gain setting on, so I tried recording with very, very low gain. Still had distortion.

My chain was this:

mics (with windscreens) -> battery module with relatively high bass roll-off -> mic inputs

I'm guessing this is because the really loud environment (4x12 guitar cabinets, 8x10 bass cabinets, large PA system, small club) is overloading the mic preamp. The signal from the mics is too loud?

This attenuator seems to be the solution. Or just plugging into the line input rather than mic inputs. Hmm. Am I right? I can't afford to waste more money, I'm a broke student!

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Mic-->battery box-->LINE IN.

Mic-in has an amplifier that you are overloading even more with the battery box. That's one cause of the distortion.

Put the volume at 20/30 unless you are trying to record something ultra bass-heavy like reggae or death metal. At a certain point the mics themselves will be overloaded by bass, but most music won't do that.

mics (with windscreens) -> battery module with relatively high bass roll-off -> mic inputs

I'm guessing this is because the really loud environment (4x12 guitar cabinets, 8x10 bass cabinets, large PA system, small club) is overloading the mic preamp. The signal from the mics is too loud?

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I recorded at 14, through the line in, with the battery box set to 160Hz bass roll off or so. I got a tiny bit of almost impossible-to-notice clipping on bass drum kicks. otherwise, it was really successful. thanks, forum! I bought a radio shack headphone volume thing just in case I ever need it, though.

for the record, I was in a really loud club, recording the band Bison BC (metal) and Hierophant (grindcore)

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160 Hz is pretty high for bass roll-off. If you are really in a show where they are pumping the subwoofers, you might go to 100 Hz at most, which will give you a lot fuller low end.

The reason is that frequency (Hz) doubles every octave. So A440 is an octave above A220, which is an octave above A110, which is an octave above A55. (The bottom note on a piano is A at 27.5). And the lower the notes you allow the unit to pick up, the richer the music will sound.

The bass roll-off is there for two reasons. One is to try and prevent the mic preamplifier from overloading; it's especially susceptible to bass. But you're not going through the preamp if you're using line-in.

The other reason is to battle the tendency of live sound guys to smother everything in bass. But if what you're hearing in the room isn't bassy, you should go easy on the roll-off.

So why do the bass kicks overload? Because they're overloading the mic itself, and that happens before the signal gets to the battery box.

I recorded at 14, through the line in, with the battery box set to 160Hz bass roll off or so. I got a tiny bit of almost impossible-to-notice clipping on bass drum kicks. otherwise, it was really successful. thanks, forum! I bought a radio shack headphone volume thing just in case I ever need it, though.

for the record, I was in a really loud club, recording the band Bison BC (metal) and Hierophant (grindcore)

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