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What Do You Record?

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What Do You Record?   31 members have voted

  1. 1. What Do You Record?

    • Filmmaking Audio (Foley, spoken word etc)
      2
    • Music (Studio)
      3
    • Music (Concerts)
      12
    • Music (Studio and Concerts)
      3
    • Interviews (Press)
      3
    • Lectures
      0
    • Other (What do you use your MD for?)
      8
    • More Than One Of These (What do you use your MD for?)
      13

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20 posts in this topic

I chose #7. I use it primarily for film and podcasting. I'll use my computer for podcast audio if I'm at home but I'm usually somewhere else recording with others at parks etc.

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The odd live concert, though not much lately, but I do record my own musical efforts, mostly flute and guitar/drums for accompaniment purposes. My MZ-B10 (of which I have acquired 2 more recently) is an invaluable tool for this purpose.

Edited by Barock

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I picked 'Other' for optical recording of songs to MD SP in real-time.

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My dad used to record my familys voices when were young to a reel to reel. We have since lost those recordings and wish we still had them to transfer them to Tape or MD.

So I used my MZ-M200 to also records my kids voices.I know we can use a camcorder but there is something of just hearing the voices that will one day bring back beautiful memories.

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Music studio and concerts is what I put down, could have been a couple of others, mostly it is for collecting and listening from a wide variety of sources

Bob

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I use them to record concerts and myself playing the guitar...to get some improvement on my playing...

ADDENDUM: I now use my minidisc recorder to record wildlife (amphibian bioacoustics specifically) for a project im running.

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I record my kids talking and the odd music event.

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Other - I record from the Music Choice channels on cable TV.

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Apart from a reasonably large collection of music I've ripped from CDs or converted from MP3s, I record radio plays and other spoken-word programmes onto my JB940 deck while I'm out at work. Also, using one of my Hi-MD recorders, I set it up to record nearly 8 hours of music from the Internet station Radio Paradise overnight, to be played back over the next few days. Last week I tried an audio book from the local library. It came on 8 CDs, with a playing time of 8.5 hours, but using Hi-LP, it fitted fine on one 74 minute MD, with acceptable quality.

I do a lot of repetitive outdoor work, so having all these recordings at hand makes the time pass much better.

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I use my minidisc(s) to record everything that I do in my practice studio each day. Individual practice sessions and sessions with other players. I just start the recorder going first off and forget about it...except for changing discs...kind of like Richard Nixon's Oval Office, for those of you who get the reference. Two or three discs a day is typical.

I also record bands at clubs (bars really) and concerts. I record w/ minidisc exclusively and my microphone(s) is the AudioTechnica AT822.

It's worth taking note, for those who inquire often about what mike to use, that the best digital recording device is only as good as the microphone attached to it. All live recordings start as an analog signal. It's far better to have a very expensive high end field mike recording to a cassete recorder that a Hi-MD set to PCM using a $79.00 microphone.

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Well, I received an ECM-MS957 bundled with a minidisc I purchased on Craigslist. I did an A-B comparison with my AT822 and must say that I simply cannot understand how Sony can charge three hundres dollars for this dreadfull microphone and most retail outlets for close to two hundres. I think it contains low end mike elements in an impressive looking housing. I'll gladly let it go for a nominal price. Mine even comes with a table stand and big foam wind screen.

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From my experience with the AT822, I would say "yes", though I'm not familiar with the 957PRO . That AT822 is discontinued but, they can still be found in some stores or on line. There is a replacement for it that I'm told is as good if not a little better but, also a bit more expensive. I paid $250 for each of my two and located one on Craigslist last year for about $175 which I snatched up my brother. (I'm now using two with a mixer in my studio and still a single mike straight into the MD when I'm in the "field". I'm sorry about my harsh description of the Sony 957 but, I stand by it. I just couldn't believe how bad it sounded.

I had started out using the Sony ECM-MS907, that $75 stereo condenser described as being just the thing for digital recording. A musician who was familiar with minidisc recording and sound mixing in general saw me recording at a session and recommended the AT822 mike. I also saw a member of MDCF, a guitarist I think, recommend the mike also. The difference between those two mikes was like comparing a Hugo to a Mercedes, which is essentially what my friend at the session had told me.

I had purchased my first AT822 based on those recommendations and blind faith and have yet to be dissapointed. But, an A-B comparison is always helpful, especially when you're talking about an expenditure in the $300 range.

I still have discs with raw live club recordings and possibly still a few discs recorded in my studio with one mike directly into my minidisc. If you PM me, we can figure out a way I can provide you with a few samples so you can compare the results with other mikes you're interested in.

-Jim

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When I worked in a big Dispatcher center, we had long intricate relief sessions. I used the MD recorder to record that relief session so I could go back to it if I needed a reminder of one of the subjects.

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I also use them to record nature animal, bird and water sounds.

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Though these days I am using the CD to MASTER and the MD to make compilations for travel music, I do have some nice music from CD, radio, tv and other sources recorded on the MD. I am waiting for some friends to call from up North, she says when the horny frogs start croaking for their mates, the woods are filled with the sounds of croaking, lololol.....

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One thing that has come in very handy is my Video recorder with the hard drive. Satelite has the music channels and I can record to the hard drive, edit then record to CD or MD, depending on the intended use. I do have a mixer in the system if there needs to be some tweaking done and I built some hi end switch boxes that also have a level function if needed. I can record pretty much most things and do it in a quality result.

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I try not to copy a 1st gen MD recording to a CD as 2nd gen recording. But I have done it if it was a one of a kind and not replaceable. But I wont copy a 2nd gen recording back to a MD as the sound deteriorates too much.

O

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music rehearsals, lectures both live and on-line, very occasional concerts. I only listen directly to minidisc player in the car. sometimes, I make cds from the minidisc recording.

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Recording with a mic - concerts, sometimes lectures or presentations.

Other uses - record FM or Digital radio programs to listen to on the way to/from work (on the train), a large collection of CD rips, a smaller collection of 'mix tapes', plus some MD's that are transfers from old cassette tapes, these being mainly bootleg concerts or odd things I recorded with a 'Micro casette' recorder, many years ago. MD, use it everyday.

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  1. I record my favorites CDs in SP/digital for everydays listening, also CDs of my friends I don't own.
  2. I record rehearsals or live demo of my music band, I'm a percussionist.
  3. I record any audio from my computer analog output to MD analog input (rarities from websites, stuff hard to get or no longer available.)

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Currently in the midst of a project to get my audiocassettes onto MD. I bought a second CS deck on Ebay to help with this. The 24-bit ADCs of the JB930 and JB940 are doing a good job. The MDs seem to sound better than their cassette sources! (Unless the CS is worn or not well-recorded to begin with.)  I'd say that most of the track marks are getting onto the MDs, too.

Update: The CS > MD project has slowed down, at least in part because I am finding less than I thought I would that I want to put on MD. I'll get there, though.

Meanwhile, I recorded a couple of MDs to CD. These were digitally recorded MDs that either had had the SCMS removed when I recorded them or I removed it when doing the transfer. Doesn't really matter. But what did matter was that I set my MD deck's (MDS-JA20ES) D.out to 16 bits. My standalone Aiwa CD-R seemed to like this, as the resulting CDs came out quite nice. I knew about this method thanks to this board. It's something I will be doing again!

 

 

 

 

Edited by bluecrab
Update to original post.

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