Jump to content
Sony Insider Forums
Sign in to follow this  
nathantw666

Use LINE-IN and not MIC

Rate this topic

Recommended Posts

Why oh why didn't I visit this forum to learn how to record? I've been frequenting this forum and the minidisc forum for years now. Unfortunately it doesn't seem I've been reading the "right" posts. I've been recording concerts for a few years now (especially after my RH1 arrived) and I've always had problems with the bass sounding like it's killing the microphones. I've purchased a couple battery boxes and even tried one with a bass cutoff at 69Hz. After Monday's concert I just had it and looked up whether I needed a better microphone (it goes up to 120db with a battery box).

What I found out makes me a bit angry I didn't look here and read other FAQ's elsewhere...like the place that sold my microphone. They all recommend for loud music to use the LINE-IN and not the MIC. The MIC sensitivity will overload and that's why the bass sounds like it's hitting a wall. They said with a battery box and a loud music to use LINE-IN. Truthfully I didn't know a microphone would work with a line-in input, but I must be wrong. If the mic is powered then it'll work.

So a few concerts "wasted" when I could have had perfect recordings. Sigh. Just goes to show that I should frequent these places a little more often.

So, the next

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi,

I discovered the same when I plugged a condenser mike into the 'line-in' jack on my NH600 which doesn't have a mike input. I was pleased to discover that the recording sounded great...exactly as when I use the mike input, set to low sensitivity, on my RH1 or NH900. I should try that on one of my ATRAC units just to test if the result is the same.

I generally don't get the low frequency overload you describe when recording in a club or concert hall when using the mike input. Are you setting the record levels manually?

If I am getting too much bass, however, my stereo condenser mics. have that low frequency roll off switch you mentioned, also called a low pass filter, that works very well to control that.

-ja

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I generally don't get the low frequency overload you describe when recording in a club or concert hall when using the mike input. Are you setting the record levels manually?

If I am getting too much bass, however, my stereo condenser mics. have that low frequency roll off switch you mentioned, also called a low pass filter, that works very well to control that.

You don't get the bass problem I got? I am setting the level manually. I try to put the level just above the middle dot on RH1.

What do you set your low pass filter to? If I use the line-in can I just bypass the low pass filter? I had it set for 69 Hz previously and was ready to make it even higher than that. What do you think?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Nathan,

My mics. are Audio Technica X/Y one point stereo, models AT822 and AT8022. They both use AA battery power but, the 8022 also can use phantom power and has larger diaphragms than the 822. They are both considered to be 'high sensitivity' microphones and designed for broadcast and professional recording.

The high pass / low roll- off switch on both have one setting when switched on. The roll-off on the AT822 is 150 HZ 6 dB/octave and on the AT8022 it's 80 Hz

12 dB/octave. On both mics., a flat response when switched in the off position.

I really only need the roll-off feature when recording in my rehearsal studio. It's a compact room, (10.5 x 11 feet), so the mics, are always very close to a sound source, maybe five feet or six feet at most. Sometimes the bass drum on my drum kit gets boomy as does the bass through the PA speakers. The roll off on both mics. work perfectly in that situation. When I'm recording in clubs I do get as close to the band as possible for best stereo separation. I'm usually recording jazz groups which are loud and amplified but, not ear splitting. The only problem I have with bass is that sometimes I don't get enough!

Are you recording really loud bands with heavy deep amplified bass? And what is your microphone?

If you can set the high pass / low roll-off closer to the settings on my mics, try that. Test it out by playing something boomy and loud on your home sound system and record with your mic.

-jim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Are you recording really loud bands with heavy deep amplified bass? And what is your microphone?

If you can set the high pass / low roll-off closer to the settings on my mics, try that. Test it out by playing something boomy and loud on your home sound system and record with your mic.

Hi ja,

Thanks for your detailed explanation on how and what you record. I usually record at concerts where there's a lot of bass and the music is loud. My microphones need to be discrete to get into the stadiums so I use the in ear ones sold by Sound Professionals, SP-TFB-2 and use either a 9v or 12v (with bass rolloff) battery box. The 12v one is new and the other night was the first time I've used it. Now that I learned about using line-in instead of mic I'm not really sure I need to use the bass rolloff. If I do I think I'll keep it at 69 Hz.

The next concert is coming up and I'll report how it goes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No need to use bass rolloff if you have line-in and a battery box. Put the unit at about 1/3 of the way up for volume and you will get a good recording.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A440,

Is the line-in jack a lower sensitivity input than the Mic. input set at low sensitivity? In my test they seemed the same but, possibly I just don't recall having to setting the recording level a bit high using line-in.

Conversely, could a very low level line signal be input through the mic input set to high sensitivity?

-ja

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No need to use bass rolloff if you have line-in and a battery box. Put the unit at about 1/3 of the way up for volume and you will get a good recording.

I just recorded the loud concert and unfortunately I didn't see this message in time. I used a 69Hz cutoff and you're right, I really didn't need it.

The recording came out PERFECTLY! I used a 12v battery box. I'm very happy with the sound, though it could use more bass. ;-)

Once again the RH1 came out like a champ. I remember reading that people had trouble with recording with the unit if it moved and that it had to be completely still when it was writing to disc. Well, I'm here to report that as long as it's not jostled around you can move around while it's recording and writing to disc. However, if you jump up and down...well, it'll be game over then.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this  

×