Jump to content

Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 09/12/2009 in Posts

  1. Windows 10 installation (Net MD): 1) Download the files in description 2) Double click on "SS43_Ultimate.exe" and install the "SonicStage" program. 3) Go to Program Files (x86) -> Sony -> Personal Audio Drivers -> Sort by type -> Highlight all the ".inf" files, right click on one of them and hit install. 4) Unzip the second attached file "sony-net-md-drivers-win764.zip" and open up the folder "Sony Net MD Drivers". 5) Right click "NETMD760.inf" and hit install. 6) Go to Program Files (x86) -> Sony -> SonicStage-> Right click on "Omgjbox.exe -> Click on Compatibility -> Under the Compatibility tab, click the box and select "Windows XP (Service Pack 3)" Launch SonicStage, plug in your Walkman and a "NET MD" tab should show up in Sonic Stage. If the "NET MD" tab does not show up for you, then you need to find the correct driver for the individual Microdisc player You may receive an error when starting it, just click "next" and agree" and open it up a 2nd time without problems. Learning how to use SonicStage is very easy. SS43_ULTIMATE.exe sony-net-md-drivers-win764.zip
    9 points
  2. Since the "Ultimate" 4.3 version seems to have gained quite a popularity, and appears to be less glitchy than any previous one, I decided to build a second release. This is purely a cosmetic update. What's changed from the first release: 1. Updated Registry Information Setup is used now. This doesn't affect minidisc functionality in any way, but may add support for some newer ATRAC phones (you still need to provide the respective drivers). 2. The link to Minidisc Community Forums in the Help menu is replaced with a link to Sony Insider Forums. 3. Installation package extraction path is no longer saved to registry. 4. Windows Installer 2.0 distribution package is not included. The complete list of changes from the official VAIO version (including changes introduced in the first release): 1. System prerequisites from Microsoft (Windows Installer 2.0, DirectX 9.0c, Windows Media Format 9, Windows Media Format 9.5, Data Access Components 2.5) are not included. 2. OpenMG Secure Module version 5.0 with the respective Registry Information is used instead of the original patched version 4.7. 3. Sony CONNECT Store support is no longer installed. 4. SonicStage Security Update is installed automatically. 5. Latest Personal Audio Drivers for SONY devices are installed automatically. 6. The VAIO support link in the Help menu is replaced with a link to Sony Insider Forums. NOTE: If you have applied the experimental SonicStage patch 4.3.02 for Vista/Windows 7, you'll need to re-apply it after installation. Download links: SonicStage 4.3 "Ultimate" Release 2 for Windows 2000/XP/Vista (you must register at Sony Insider forums to download) Mini-mode skins Recommended PxEngine update
    6 points
  3. Hello everyone! I'm new to this forum, and let me say that I love to see the love and conversation about MiniDisc keep going on I'm popping in just to let you know that I've recently released an app for NetMD devices. I wrote the app mainly for myself, but I thought it might be useful for some of you too! So, and here's the link to use it -> https://stefano.brilli.me/webminidisc/ And here's a short demo of how app works Any feedback is welcome! Stefano
    5 points
  4. As promised in one of my previous posts, here is the trailer for 'The Field Recordist' which features some of the mini disc recorders, together with recorded tracks: UPDATED - HERE IS THE COMPLETE FILM: Best heard with headphones.
    4 points
  5. Hello! Just thought I'll report it here, if you're trying to create an account without a connection with an already existing account like Google or alike, it's simply impossible to do so, because of incorrectly loaded reCaptcha. To make this account I had to rewrite the part of the site responsible for the captcha. If anyone else is experiencing the same difficulties, here are the steps I used to create my account: Go to https://forums.sonyinsider.com/register/ In devtools, open the `head` tag and remove all the scripts that mention recaptcha Add a new script, with `src="https://www.google.com/recaptcha/api.js"` Execute the following JavaScript code: const captcha = document.querySelector("[data-ipscaptcha]"); const parent = captcha.parentElement; captcha.remove(); const newCaptcha = document.createElement("div"); parent.appendChild(newCaptcha); grecaptcha.ready(() => grecaptcha.render(newCaptcha, {sitekey: "6LdgERMTAAAAAC4kTmm7BH1laShX3teATAV_6FIY"})); After that, you should be able to click on the captcha and create your account by executing the following JS code (the submit button is broken): document.querySelector("form").submit();
    3 points
  6. Finally, my homebrew laser power meter is put together. It cost $3 worth of surface mount components, a used disc sacrificed for the shell, a piece of pcb, and some other stuff I found in the back of my drawer. Initially I tested it with my digital multimeter hooked on those test terminals, but then I found this neat little five-digit Volt-meter I bought some time ago on ebay, I think it was five bucks or so with free shipping from China. Without much fine tuning, I popped this little probe into all the decks I had at hand, and measured the laser power. From the mV readings and the nominal laser power values I calculated the mV-to-mW multipliers, and I took the average of a unit I trusted the most, a 940. Using this sole multiplier as the "calibration", I recalculated the measured mW figures and compared to the factory recommended range. Most of the other units were nicely within specification, but this 530 in question, that immediately popped out, being near 40% below the necessary values, i.e., 0,55 mW and 4,32 mW versus 0,9 mW and 7,0 mW respectively. Now, it might be that easy, but before changing anything, I want to check the IOP, to see, whether that meets the specs, and set the measured value for further adjustments. For this I will need that rig connecting to the drive, currently waiting for the special connector to arrive. So much for now, I will update the thread as I progress. Some photos attached below, just for fun.
    3 points
  7. I received a similar, albeit slightly smaller, mix of boxed and unboxed discs today too 🙂
    2 points
  8. Which sort of cases are you after? You used to be able to buy the basic hinged jewel cases from Amazon but I've not seen them on there for a few years now: If you're UK based Retro Style Media sell them: https://www.retrostylemedia.co.uk/product/clear-minidisc-case Price per case varies depending on how many you buy. Note that the quoted price is ex VAT so you'll need to factor that in as well. They also sell the larger cases that pre-recorded discs used to come in back in the 90s: They come in a variety of colours but are a lot more expensive. You can find them here: https://www.retrostylemedia.co.uk/shop/minidisc-cases That website also has templates to download for the inserts etc. There's a bit more info (and a video) here:
    2 points
  9. Don't worry about it - I got myself a Sony LAM for testing and ended up falling in love with the whole LAM series of devices. I have 3 now, so I use that functionality regularly 😆
    2 points
  10. Over the past couple of months, I've been bitten by the MD bug again. I hadn't visited this forum in a VERY long time. I've used one of my MZ-NH900s at my work desk on almost a daily basis for 10+ years. It sits it's original cradle, powered from the AC adapter because the battery long since gave up the ghost. I have about 20 disc's (a mix of Hi-MD and standard MD My other NH900 has been broken for years after it fell out of my pocket and a disc got jammed. Was able to get the disc out by disassembling the recorder but when I all went back together the buttons were no longer responsive... So I put it in a storage box with my other MD stuff that wasn't used anymore. FF 1month ago, I was digging thru some things and came across my box MD recorders. Pulled out the NH900 and took it apart again. Long story short, it's had been returned to service! While looking for info on repair, I came across this site and an intro to Reddit MD. My interest stoked again, burned some new disc's, reorganized some of my favorites, and am trying my hand at labeling. I've also managed to buy a couple of new Hi-MD blanks and some used standard MDs. It's always fun to go thru used disc's from someone else to see what's on them 🙂 My MD arsenal consists of: MZ-R500, MZ-N707 (eprom nodded), MZ-N920, IM-DR420, MZ-NH600D, 2-MZ-NH900s, 2-MZ-RH10s (both with bad displays), and a MZ-RH910. 150ish standard MDs and 15 Hi-MDs. Most of my standard disc's are Hi-MD formated and most of the music is burned in ATRAC3plus @256k. I simply LOVE this format!
    2 points
  11. Nice to see SIF back up. Why was it down? It was quite a long time. I think many people have given up on it. That http://www.minidisc.wiki has turned out pretty nice btw. Still has a ways to go, but it has data on some devices not found anywhere else in English.
    2 points
  12. I don't have a question, just wanted to post a brief "ode" to my Sony MZ-R90 which I got, unexpectedly, as a birthday present in 2000. It transformed portable audio for me, but six short months later, my MZ-R90 was stolen by an opportunistic thief. Not long after that, I moved on to MP3 players, but just recently I have been reminiscing wistfully about that beautiful little piece of music technology. I had the black version, and I think the industrial design is really magnificent.
    2 points
  13. Back in 1997, long before MP3 was anything more than a concept, I was serving in the Air Force and frequently deployed overseas. Some guys on the squadron introduced me to a strange format for making music portable. MiniDisc. I soon got to learn that those tough little discs survived the rough-and-tumble of life in a kit-bag. We each bought portable players, and would ‘pool’ our discs together to make little music libraries, would trade discs with one another, and would copy CD’s for one another back home. No matter where we were in the world, AA batteries were easy to obtain, and just a handful of batteries would literally last weeks. It was a pocket-sized bit of luxury that we could carry with us, and I loved it. ......then, along came MP3 players and the ubiquitous ‘iPod’. Suddenly we could carry all of our music in a small space, and it seemed that the MiniDisc was dead. Within about 3 years everyone I knew had ditched the format and were literally giving away their discs and players, as were oil-rig workers, fishermen, and other locals who worked away from home for extended periods. I too, confined my MiniDisc collection to a box in the loft, and bought an iPod Classic. Fast-forward to 2005, and I deployed for a 4-month tour to Iraq. My iPod came with me, and I had the small luxury of my music collection to fall back on, OR SO I THOUGHT. By the second week I had the sickening ‘Sync Reset’ display (which of course was impossible without my PC) and in one fell swoop I lost my music. Other guys had problems with the portable power-generators cooking their wall-plug chargers, and soon quite a few of us had lost the use of our players, just when we would have appreciated them the most! Back home, and I was quickly falling out of love with my iPod. It seemed that whenever I updated my collection there would be issues with mixed/missing title-tracks and artwork. Any albums entitled ‘Greatest Hits’ would become an amalgamated mess, and whilst the battery-life seemed to get ever shorter, the demands for a ‘sync reset’ increased. The love was fading. I noticed something else, too. My listening habits were changing. My seemingly endless access to music made me a lazy listener, and I would frequently jump from album to album, track to track, and would often skip mid-way through a track. My days of listening to an album the way that the artist intended, had gone. This wasn’t music enjoyment. ....and so, by 2008 I was back to my MiniDisc, and what I revival it was! Equipment that had previously been prohibitively expensive was now dirt-cheap, and I was living the hobby like a millionaire! I soon had units for every occasion with Sony JA20ES and JA50ES decks for hifi use, numerous portable players, and a Pioneer MEH P9000 head-unit for the car. I could afford to be extravagant with discs, and my well used dozen or so swelled up to over 1,000. That was 10 years ago, and nothing much since then has changed. I still indulge in the childhood enjoyment of putting a ‘mixtape’ together in real-time, copying music from my CD’s and vinyl to Type-R SP to listen to in the car, or out walking the dog. Because space is at a premium my playlists are more carefully considered, and I listen to each track in full. My listening-habits are back to where they should be. In 20 years I can count on one hand the number of corrupted discs I’ve suffered, only ever having to re-copy one album. I keep discs and a spare player at work, in the summerhouse and in the car, and I have a physical, tangible connection with my music collection again. MiniDisc as a commercial format is dead, and I’m OK with that. It continues to live on in my household, and probably will do for years to come, maybe even for another decade or more. I continue to love the ‘forgotten format’, and those robust little discs give me everything I need.
    2 points
  14. Hi Folks, Long time no post, busy with child rearing. :-) I do stop by to read up on new posts and topics. I ran across this video on YouTube yesterday, sorry to post if everyone has already seen it but it was good to see and I wanted to share with all. Cheers!
    2 points
  15. It is currently admitted that the MZ-RH1 has the best DAC, ergo the best sound. I prefer however the sound of QS and ES Sony decks.
    2 points
  16. Hi all! So I've started a little project for myself. Minidisc never really caught on too well in canada so I won't be stmbling on any racks at the thrift shop anytime soon. I've been looking for storage solutions, haven't been a big fan of the wine box idea, generally I haven't seen anything that really caught my eye. For some reason it never dawned on me in the last year to 3D print some racks... I'm not sure why, I've been 3D printing everything else for years.... So I designed these up yesterday with some spare time. They're very rough still and very utilitarian. The larger one holds 10 discs and is meant to stack vertically (and has holes for nesting feet, and holes for screws). The smaller one to the right I haven't tested yet but I am thinking of a wall unit that makes the discs look like they are floating out of the wall. Edit wise I'm going to shrink the width by 2mm and perhaps put the discs at a slight downard angle rather than 90 degree so that if they were on an uneven surface, they'd still stay in the rack. What do you guys think? Feel free to toss any ideas my way! (also, for curiosity sake, the larger one took 8 hours to print! 3d printing is pretty cool but it's still a very slow process.) (The render) and printed
    2 points
  17. I got the drivers installed on my computer. I recommend watching this youtube video thats how i did it.
    2 points
  18. In case anyone is interested... I´ve written a review of the Sony MZ-R 50. http://marlene-d.blogspot.de/2013/07/the-legendary-sony-mz-r-50-review.html
    2 points
  19. I just wanted to say that it is nice to have some new members who are clearly MD lovers around to join in on the discussion and add new thoughts, ideas and opinions. Welcome all. :-)
    2 points
  20. Buy LIP-4 battery. First open all the cover of LIP-4. then you can small PCB. just remove the PCB using soldering iron or else. Do the same things with LIP-3 batteries. take the small PCB from LIP-3 and put to LIP-4 battery cell use soldering iron. Then cover you new battery, make sure it won't have electronics shortcuts. You'll have a new long lasting battery. It works on my MZ-N10.
    2 points
  21. I have a Sony MDS-JE780 for sale. It is silver and in mint condition as it has been hardly used. It is based in Wolverhampton so can be collected, or can be posted at additional cost. (I estimate about £7 with recorded delivery) £80 ono. Spec taken from the Sony website: Hybrid Pulse D/A Converter ATRAC DSP Type-S Long Time Recording and Playback (LP2, LP4) Pitch Control Scale Factor Edit NetMD Control A1 Keyboard Terminal 1 x Optical & 1 x Coaxial Input & 1 x Optical Output Available inblack and silverSee the link for more info.... http://www.sony.co.u...=TechnicalSpecs
    2 points
  22. MiniDisc is not useless; it's obsolete. There is a key difference. Nothing as multifaceted as a MiniDisc recorder can be said to be useless. That said, I think that even if Sony had marketed MiniDisc successfully, it would be obsolescent today because its competitors are more feature-rich. I have difficulty following some of the logic in this thread. MiniDisc and MP3 players both have shuffle functions. It's up to the user whether or not to use them, and absolutely nothing about an MP3 player compels one to do so. It SHOULD go without saying that either is just as capable of playing entire albums chronologically. You're arguing against your perceptions of MP3 users' supposed preferences, which are likely exaggerated and unfounded. The issue was the native functionality of the devices and which better suited the questioner. I still have my MiniDisc players, though I almost exclusively use my MP3 player (and never on shuffle). I may be returning to reporting soon and thus would use my MiniDisc to record, even though my MP3 player has a voice recorder. I also take out MiniDisc sometimes just for nostalgia. Whereas many of you are exalting album listening, I actually got into MiniDisc because it facilitated playlists, but now MP3 players do this better because the track need not be re-uploaded to form the playlist. Album listening has its advantages and purposes, but playlists demonstrate the user's creativity and make for great time travel. In my moments of nostalgia, I can call up playlists of the songs that defined eras I miss. It's a beautiful thing. One of you said you found MP3 players useless because they could not do all the things a MiniDisc player could. That depends on the MP3 player. (Further, it's a bogus statement because any mass storage device that plays music clearly has a twofold desirable purpose.) I actually can edit titles and move files on the go, but let's be honest: It is rare that such an act is of such pressing import that it can't wait until one gets home. My MP3 player is an Archos 5, which, like many MP3 players, has great sound quality, radio, a 250-gigabyte hard drive, a voice recorder, Wi-FI, Web radio and TV, DVR, picture display, and video. Useless because it's an MP3 player? Oh, brother. Much of this stems from your zeal to vindicate the MiniDisc, which I love. Another example is the citation of an intangible such as "cool factor," which lies in the eye of the beholder. Consider that being in the in-crowd like an Apple user can be said to be cool. Also, cool as in different just means anything opposed to the leading product, and that doesn't necessarily mean a MiniDisc. A lesser-known MP3 player can turn heads, but turning heads is not where the joy in product use lies. It is also flawed logic to assert that one likes MiniDisc because one prefers to carry around just a few albums. One can choose to listen to just a few on an MP3 player, first of all. The mere presence of all the other tracks you have neatly stored on the hard drive will not weigh heavily on the mind. Second, both MP3 players and MiniDiscs are mass storage devices. That's like one compulsive overeater defaming another because the other is even worse. That does not make you the icon of restraint; rather, you prefer a lesser example of excess. I do believe there still are real advantages to MiniDisc that relate to its native functionality. It's durable, sounds great, and records. It edges out MP3 in battery life, line-in recording, and usually voice recording. Actually, recording is where its greatest strength is now. Another strength is that different models are tailored to different uses; some have radio, some record and others have a digital amplifier, for instance. I love that my MP3 player works with Windows Media Player, which keeps track of the tracks you have and have not added to the device. Syncing automatically adds the new tracks. If I went back to MinDisc, I'd have to guess where I left off as I tried to upload all the music I have purchased since then to MiniDiscs. Also, I don't have to be bothered with SonicStage or ATRAC anymore, and I am glad. I don't have a second-generation Hi-MD player, so I can't put MP3s on them.
    2 points
  23. I have an N510 and a DN430. Both sound really good. I also have some S1's which, I know, are type R. They both sound excellent to me. I figured I'd take the (possible) slight noise quality hit and lack of remote for bombproof (especially in Orygun) performance of the S1. I can say those DN430's sound just fine. I think you can find that model with a radio too
    2 points
  24. ANy one have any opinion what the website was doing when it was off. Some times there was what seemed like a blue set of sony menues but each option in the address bar had a very very long line of random characters that to my mind looked like some kind of malware code,. So I thought the site had been hacked
    1 point
  25. I have tested your new version and it works very well, the only field I now have to type myself, after the import of the CD, is Year Released. Your program is especially useful when importing a CD and want the result files coded as Atrac Advanced Lossless, for other lossless (or lossy) codecs there are several (free) rip programs with direct connection to Discogs or MusicBrainz etc.. For example you can rip to WMA lossless and import the files in SonicStage while keeping the tags. Your instructions how to use the program are very good also.
    1 point
  26. To the best of my knowledge the only differences between the Sharp SR40, SR50, SR75 was in the items that came with it and the colours. Some came with a rechargeable battery, some didn't, some came with a remote and some didn't. Sharp were in the habit of doing this, same thing applies to the MT range. So for service or operation purposes manuals for either SR50 or SR75 should suffice. The higher the number (40/50/75) the more you got with it and obviously the higher the price. I'm therefore guessing the SR40 was the budget model and didn't come with either rechargeable battery or a remote, although it will probably still have the required socket, as the remotes were available as an optional extra. I still have an absolutely pristine, complete and boxed SR50. I used to have an SR75 but unfortunately that gave up the ghost a few years ago. Hope it works for you when it arrives.
    1 point
  27. Hi, as MP3 can be transfer with no conversion (and compression) to the M200, keep the MP3 format.
    1 point
  28. Hi, I'm new in the Minidisc world as i bought my first ever unit 2 days ago from the internet. The problem I have is that I cannot charge the flat battery(NH-10WN) of the MD. The adaptor is correct connected, and the battery is inserted correctly. I connect the adaptor to the plug of the MD and press the STOP/CANCEL/CRG button once and I get the display "Charging". After 2.5 hours I tried to play a disc but I was getting low battery, so I charged it for another 2.5 hours. That happened 4-5 times. The unit itself works ok when it"s connected to the adaptor. Am i doing something wrong or should i send the MD back to the place I bought it?
    1 point
  29. The internal batteries for the timer are "nc-aa660ft" seen these batteries ? I think most if not any 1,2V AA cell will do the Job http://www.ebay.de/itm/Batterie-Telephone-sans-fil-pour-SONY-MZ-R5ST-/351516807256?hash=item51d808d058:g:pEYAAOSwPgxVSFGM I´ll check my unit later.probably my batteries are drained out too. But as i never used the timer function it didn´t happened to cause any problems.
    1 point
  30. Hi, in memoriam No Adjust! - In this case, it means the contents of the EEPROM is damaged. Before the error "no adjust" occurs, You can copy the contents of EEPROM. When an error occurs, you can upload the memory dump to the chip. EEPROM: IC302 Seiko Instruments S-93C46AMFN Buffer content from address: 00000000h, to address: 0000003Fh memory for user settings and adjust settings Programmer: Elnec BeeProg+ BAT300, battery backup (3V ML614 rechargeable lithium battery) is only for Real Time Clock cross-reference: Panasonic EECEN0F204RK http://www.tme.eu/en/details/eec-en0f204rk/supercapacitors/panasonic/eecen0f204rk/ Caution: Connect an AC adapter after replacing battery, and leave the unit for more than 8 hours. Dump from AM-F72 (No Adjust!) 0000000000 8212 B2B4 8C04 A20A 04A2 CA2C 0050 D8C0 0000000008 ACA8 116C 601E E0DF 3800 E020 797E 0000 0000000010 0B0A 00F0 FFFF FFFF FFFF FFFF FFFF FFFF 0000000018 FFFF FFFF FFFF FFFF FFFF FFFF FFFF FFFF 0000000020 FFFF FFFF FFFF FFFF FFFF FFFF FFFF FFFF 0000000028 FFFF FFFF FFFF FFFF FFFF FFFF FFFF FFFF 0000000030 2AD0 E8F0 E0B0 E0B0 E0F0 0C0C 0C0C 0000 0000000038 0000 0080 0010 D002 0000 0000 0000 0008 Dump from AM-F75 (working) 0000000000 8212 B2B4 8C04 A20A 04A2 CA2C 0050 D8C0 0000000008 ACA8 116C 601E E0DF 3800 E020 797E 0000 0000000010 0B0A 00F0 FFFF FFFF FFFF FFFF FFFF FFFF 0000000018 FFFF FFFF FFFF FFFF FFFF FFFF FFFF FFFF 0000000020 FFFF FFFF FFFF FFFF FFFF FFFF FFFF FFFF 0000000028 FFFF FFFF FFFF FFFF FFFF FFFF FFFF FFFF 0000000030 2AD0 E808 E088 9088 D888 74B8 24D8 0000 0000000038 7F00 8080 0010 7303 0000 0000 0000 0004 dump EEPROM from working AM-F75 (binary format): dump_AMF75.zip 30h - laser power correction temperature correction, FBIAS, RLCD: 37h - ? 38h - ? 3Dh - ? Regards, Maciek EDIT: cross-reference for IC302: 93LC46B-I/ST 2.5÷5.5V (TSSOP8) Microchip Technology http://www.tme.eu/en/details/93lc46b-i_st/serial-eeprom-memories-integ-circ/microchip-technology/ or 93AA46B-I/ST 1.8÷5.5V (TSSOP8) Microchip Technology 93AA46B-I/MS 1.8÷5.5V (MSOP) Microchip Technology 93LC46B-I/MS 2.5÷5.5V (MSOP) Microchip Technology after programming the chip (if cross-reference) must be flipped: ps. sorry for my english
    1 point
  31. Hi Dave, I am afraid, you won't find such a software hack. This kind of functionality is burnt into the main chip of the unit, and while there supposed to be a way to reload the firmware of the deck, I have not seen any modified versions yet (well, this does not mean too much anyway), nor any posts here or on other forums, that would discuss the how-to. Sony is known for keeping such proprietary firmware totally confidential, and hackers would only work on something that enjoys wide interest (i.e., when back in old DVD times, they hacked drives' firmware for region code, etc.). You may try to replace the main IC on the main board of the 440 with the one from a 640. I mean, if performing such a delicate rework is worth it for the end result.
    1 point
  32. Ask help to jonathanpotato, he is a geat MD deck specialist http://jonathan.dupre.free.fr/
    1 point
  33. I would like to propose an alternative, based on my own experience. I own two Sony MZ-RH1's, as well as two HHB MDP500's. I definitely prefer the HHB for field recording, for the following reasons: 1. Robustness: the MDP500 is designed for professional field use ; the MZ-RH1 is very fragile. 2. Connectors: the MDP500 has XLR (line and mic) inputs ; the MZ-RH1 has a mini-jack. 3. Ergonomy: the MDP500 has large keys and display ; the MZ-RH1 has tiny buttons and display. 4. Connectivity: the MDP500 uploads via plain USB Audio ; the MZ-RH1 requires specific Sony Software. 5. Autonomy: the MDP500 uses standard batteries ; the MZ-RH1 uses specific Sony gumstick batteries. 6. Resilience: the MDP500 uses MD's that can be recovered after a crash ; Hi-MD's cannot be restored. 7. Price: a second-hand MDP500 can be bought for less than 200 euros (typically on on www.ebay.co.uk). In short, I would recommend the MDP500, connected to the output of your console via balanced XLR's, to record your own performances on stage. And yes, you will have to accept one ATRAC 4.5 compression (during recording), followed by one ATRAC 4.5 decompression (during the real-time upload to the PC).
    1 point
  34. If you do your own field recordings with the unit, I advise you to choose a Hi-MD for these reasons 1) quality of recording (even lossless with PCM) 2) lengh of the recording if you get Hi-MD discs (but classic MD formatted in Hi-MD mode offer also a rather long lengh of recording if you don't choose the lossless quality) 3) possibilty of upload of your own recordings even in WAV format : <<Self-Recording Upload Function Hi-MD Walkman recorders offer two-way communication from the PC to device and from the device back to the PC. With the mic in feature5 you can make a self-recording on the device and transfer content back to the PC.>> technical short extract of the MZ-RH900. Nota : Sony has stated that only analog-source recordings created on Hi-MD equipment will be eligible for upload. The Sony MZ-RH1/M200(for Mac) is the best (and most expensive) but others Hi-MD recordings units allow also the upload of your own field recordings. See the minidisc.org browser for units and the FAQ. Price range : Rh1 > 200 to 800US$ (!), others recording Hi-MD units 50 to 250US$, Hi-MD blank discs much more than 10US$ nowadays (just format classic MDs in Hi-MD mode to save money.
    1 point
  35. Decks - Sony QS models 930,940,980 blanks - are the any freecycler orgs where you you ask for free 2nd hand blanks
    1 point
  36. I mostly agree with PhilippeC except that I do like the MDLP machines just because I can put more audio on them if I want to. My ears can't tell the difference between SP and LP2 anyway. I do have a couple of Hi-MD units but one is used to record a radio program every week and the other is a backup and my MZ-M200 is used to upload to my computer. I have about 300 or so blanks so I should be alright there (although sometimes that doesn't seem like it will be enough). I also agree with the AA battery because I don't think those will be going anywhere anytime soon.
    1 point
  37. Hello guys! What i have here today is a like new, used very little, nw-ms90d. This player is in excellent cosmetic condition and include all original accessories. I even have the original box in excellent condition. To make it worthwhile, I even include 6 new genuine sony 128mb memory sticks (no separate packaging for the sticks though) for you guys to use and get started right away. What I'm looking for is about $99 along with shipping (about $5). If you're interested, visit this link from amazon.com where i list my auction: http://www.amazon.com/gp/offer-listing/B00...8973&sr=8-1 Thank you for your time!
    1 point
  38. Do you plan on using any of them for music, or just to make money? If you want to know what things are worth to sell, them sell them and find out. If you are only selling them on eBay (and not just you), good luck to you - but how about not wasting the time of forum users by posting about them here WHEN THERE IS A DEDICATED CLASSIFIEDS SECTION that you people are completely disrespecting!! With all due respect, Danny
    1 point
  39. Hi Tom B, I assume you mean to ask will SonicStage 4.3 work in Windows 7, 8 ans 8.1 environments. The answer is yes and many folks are doing this including myself. There are several threads in these forums which detail the steps to get things working, Windows 8 versions require one or two additional steps to get around the installation of an unsigned driver. You'll definitely need to download two packages from the Forum downloads section, the SonicStage 4.3 Ultimate version and the 64 bit Windows drivers. Do a search on the forums for "Windows 64" and you locate the threads which contain the instructions for performing the setup. It is not difficult at all. We really need to create a couple of documents to place in the downloads section to explicitly define the process for each OS which users can be pointed to for directions.
    1 point
  40. If you want to set your Creative card to the only format the MD stores in, set it to 24 bit and 44.1 kHz. It cannot ever work with 96 kHz. Not ever. 48 kHz are bad too, because your MD recorder has to resample it to 44.1 kHz. Save that work for your PC, that one is much better at it. Recording in 44.1 kHz will only work if you disable any DSP inside your card. Otherwise, everything will be resampled from 44.1 to 48 and back to 44.1. This process (as performed by the Creative) will add distortions so it´s important to switch all DSPs off. Why 24 bit? Because your MD recorder is capable of using this bit-depth to gain a sonic advantage. Disadvantage? None. The suggestion from PhilippeC to use ReplayGain is very reasonable, that way you can encode all your music with correct RMS levels (I´d recommend 'Album' mode).
    1 point
  41. Hi all; I have decided to test some md for their LP2 (MDLP) playing ability. LP2 is a widely accepted format and plays on all units made after about year 2000. It has a comparable bit rate to many digital broadcast sources that advertise as “near CD quality”. So there is interest in listening to different portable units’ ability to sound good playing this format. I have a large collection, of which this is a (hopefully) representative selection. The list is (ordered as in the picture): First row: Sony mz-n505 year 2002 Sony mz-e10 year 2002 Sony mz rh710 year 2005 Sony mz-rh10 year 2005 Second row: Sony mz-n910 year 2003 Panasonic sj-mr230 year 2002 Sharp md-ds70 year 2003 Sharp im-dr80 year 2003 Not pictured: Sony mz-rh1 year 2006 I recorded a MD TDK “ M” 80 min with rh1 in LP2 mode. So we do not depend on the recording ability of different units. Some tracks of classical music are sent to me already encoded as LP2 by sfbp, mostly by direct recording of digital sources through optical input to a Sony full-size MDLP deck: Those tracks were then uploaded, emailed, and downloaded. This means that the bit pattern (once recording is made) is transferred to the disk exactly. Berlioz – Roman Carnival Overture Mozart – Piano Sonata in C. K.545 Bach – Christmas Oratorio Part 1 Stanford – Magnificat in C Bach – Wachet Auf Organ Prelude BWV.645 Scriabin – Piano Conc No.1 in F# 1st movement Some are recorded by my CD collection, using Sony’s Simple Burner: Rimsky-Korsakov – Scheherazade Oregon – Beyond Words – Chesky Records Brad Mehldau – Songs – Warner Bros Arne Domnerus – Antiphone Blues – Propius Richard Galliano – New York Tango – Dreyfus Steve Grossmann – Michel Petrucciani – Dreyfus Autunmn in Seattle – Tsuyoshi Yamamoto - FIM Ella Fitgerald and Louis Armstrong - Verve Some tracks of Mina My choice of kind of music isn’t accidental. It is not about judgement, to say one genre is better than another. However in Classical and Jazz music, you can easily hear a solo musical instrument – this is a good test for our comparison purpose. I have also included some wonderful singing. In my philosophy: 1. the sound of a machine must be well-sounding with no equalization applied to the output circuits by the user.2. The sound must not be fatiguing to the ears. Fulfilling these conditions means that the design of these circuits has been excellent. Corrections of various types can allow a sound improvement under certain conditions. I seek to control the tone, the sound image, overall the sense of good sound. But not for today! The less electronic items are interposed in the signal path, the cleaner the sound. So I tested these portable MD units without remote, connected directly to a AKG K340 headphones. This also means we eliminated any variations in the remote, although sfbp assures me that the signal path for these remotes to the ‘phones is a pass-through. The Sony MZ-E10 needs to be connected by remote, we have no choice there. As reference for the quality of the recordings I used my sound system: CD Player Naim CDX 2 <a href="http://www.naimaudio.com/hifi-product-type/563">http://www.naimaudio.com/hifi-product-type/563 Pre-amp Klimo Merlino http://www.klimo.com...ent/merlino.htm Audiophile tube amp Klimo Kent http://www.klimo.com/content/kent.htm Loudspeaker Tannoy Turnberry SE I cannot compare directly the portable mds with a hifi amplifier with cost 100 times more and have a weight 1000 times more; this is from a different planet; but hearing the CD samples on my HiFi reminds me what the full sound of a given piece is supposed to be. Unfortunately I cannot reproduce the samples from sfbp through this amp reliably, as I do not have an MDLP deck with optical out – nor do I have an optical input to my amplifier. He says they’re good. Results: My overall impressions are coloured by my expectations, of course. I was unable to do a blind test where I did not know which portable was being played. I expected there to be an improvement in sound as this technology evolved over several years; and to me it is clearly audible. I also expected the more expensive units to perform better; they did. PART 1 - Classical First I listened to classical music SONY (by order of year of manufacture) MZ-N505 The sound is flat, muddy, slightly acidic. Hard to differentiate orchestral colours, especially in full orchestra. Acute piano, violin too acute. Entry-level machine aimed, in my opinion, to people with few financial resources and few requests. Significantly better with MegaBass 1, but for this test we are ignoring that. This is the only Sony unit we tried that is Type-R, all others (below) are Type-S. MZ-N910 The sound set is good but not very precise. Solos are beautiful, piano, violin and also vocal. Good stereo separation. This unit uses the same optical head as the later HiMD units. MZ-E10 (using the unit’s remote!) Sound very crisp, good tonal balance. Full orchestra well balanced. Piano very "alive"; violin solos beautiful. However the sound is very airy and neutral with a feeling of "coldness". The remainder of the Sony units were HiMD. However it has been commented that the HiMD units reproduce MDLP better than MDLP units (since the technology continued to evolve) – hence their inclusion. All HiMD units include Type-S. MZ-RH10 Clear sound with accurate tonal range. Voice well reproduced. Full orchestral balance is excellent. Good piano, very nice violin. Powerful bass without thumping. Stereo image very good. This is a second-generation HiMD unit. I did not test the first generation (NH7/8/900) yet. MZ-RH710 Good overall, no problem with the full orchestra. Clear and well balanced. Excellent vocals, piano and violin both beautiful. The tonal range seems better than the RH10. Overall the sound is interesting and most engaging. Addictive, the ear desires more. This unit has not been sold in North America. A pity. MZ-RH 1 (same as MZ-M200) I cannot define the RH1 on the same level as the other devices. Suddenly I lose any feeling that I am listening to a "compressed" sound. This is IT. This technology has evolved so well. Where is Sony continuing its evolution? . SHARP MD-DS70** Well balanced sound, full orchestra is a little short on bass register. Instruments well differentiated. Piano, well defined, but a little opaque. Violin good. Vocals beautiful. IM-DR80** Overall the sound is identical to the DS 70. Some evolution – I noticed more spatial separation and better reproduction of the violin. As well, using the headphones 4-pole Sharp, sound is considerably better, near the best tested. So there is a problem eliminating other influences for purposes of these comparisons. PANASONIC SJ-MR230 Sound muddy, narrow tonal range down. Piano opaque little violin and voice. Has trouble with balance of full orchestra. Not a particularly desirable experience. (comment from sfbp, who is editing this: even the N505 sounds better than most Ipods. How much of that is the ATRAC codec vs MP3 is unclear, although recent Sony MP3-capable units such as PCM-M10 are very good. Earlier MP3-capable units such as RH10 are less good, but we are not trying to test MP3 today). Part 2: Jazz Music SONY MZ-N505 Slight improvement on classical music The sound still sound muddy. Lack of spatiality. Piano weak. Accordion acid Organ clear Saxophone clear MZ-N910 Full sound, even if the "cold" Instruments are not perfectly reproduced. Fair playback treble and bass. Good dynamic. Good sound stage. Accordion slightly annoying. Organ clear Saxophone clear. MZ-E10 * Excellent sound overall. Slight lack of definition of the instruments. Good dynamic. Excellent sound stage. Accordion excellent Organ clear Saxophone good. * Note: Sony mz-e10 must be connected by remote MZ-RH710 Beautiful sound. Very good definition of instruments. Slight lack of bass. Great feeling of space. Good dynamic. Sound stage "alive". Accordion excellent Organ good. Saxophone good. MZ-RH10 Good overall sound setting; looks beautiful Very good definition of instruments. Great feeling of space and dynamics Sound stage well defined. Accordion excellent Organ good. Saxophone good. MZ-RH 1 We can define a reference point. The only problem: I have the European version and the volume is too low. SHARP MD-DS 70** Good general approach of the sound, nice, better than classical music on this unit. Good definition of instruments. Great feeling of space and dynamics Sound stage slightly muffled. Accordion well. Organ acceptable. Saxophone good. IM-DR 80** Good general approach of the sound, comparable to the DS 70 Good definition of instruments. Great feeling of space and dynamics Good sound stage. Accordion well. Organ good. Saxophone good. ** Note: A clarification, using the headphones 4-pole Sharp (special design), sound is considerably better, near the best tested. PANASONIC SJ-MR230 Sound mixed, smooth, with little dynamics and low bass response. Sound stage not focused. Accordion poor. Organ unclear. Saxophone acceptable. GENERAL COMMENTS Voice Voice reproduction levels any difference between devices. In the N505 during the duets the voice appears mixed. In the MR230, the vocals seem "flat" without character. In the N910 voices are not perfectly clear. In E10 voice is somewhat "incomplete". RH 10, RH 710, DS70, DR80 the voice is good, listenable, with no obvious deficiencies. The RH1 is still “IT”. Conclusions To end the test I listened my wife's iPod touch. I hear sounds, not music. It is flat, soulless. The two channels are different, but as if I hear two different songs. Having to give a score to various devices: 4.0 Ipod 6.0 MZ-N505 6.5 SJ-MR230 6.5 MZ-N910 8.5 MZ-E10 MD-DS70 IM-DR80 9.5 MZ-RH10 10.0 MZ-RH710 MZ-RH1 As expected, you can follow an improvement in sound over the passing years as the technology improves. Obviously the original selling price may affect the characteristics, as high end models will tend to have better components. Using headphones, 4-pole Sharp, the vote of rises 1 / 2 - 1 point by placing them among the best. RH1 is wonderful, recommended for those who want a sound "monitor"; always impeccable. RH710 is not as clean but "feel" sound in my opinion the best, most engaging. RH10 has a sound very similar to RH1, although not so well calibrated. The two models of SHARP have a sound "sparkling, cheerful" that does not tire of hearing, certainly there are fans of this sound. Sergio (with some help from Stephen)
    1 point
  42. This is my photographic How-To guide to adding S/PDIF digital audio outputs to my Sony MXD-D5C, which was equipped from the factory with only analog outputs. No soldering to the deck is required This guide is intended to be the companion thread to my earlier discussion: ...which in turn was inspired by: ...as well as: Adding a Digital out to MDS-JE330 Adding Digital Optical Output to a Sony MDS-JE440 Minidisc Deck Digital Optical Output Mod for Sony MDS-JE470 Minidisc Deck ...which I found here: Construction projects: Adding Digital I/Os LET'S BEGIN! Sony MXD-D5C, North America model: Goal: to build four working S/PDIF digital audio outputs, featuring a relatively clean-looking installation: ***DISCLAIMER*** WARNING: Do Not Attempt. Working with electronic equipment can be hazardous. There is a great risk of electric shock. You do not want to get The Shock. Furthermore, static discharge from simply handling your components can render your equipment useless. I cannot be responsible for damage or destruction to your equipment, reversible or otherwise. I cannot be responsible for Death, Injury, or Insult yourself or others may sustain while attempting to modify your own gear or that of others. The methods described here worked for me, but your equipment and experience may differ. This will void your warranty. ****** Background: I've had this Sony MXD-D5C 5-CD Changer / Minidisc deck for over ten years, and even though I love this unit, I have always been frustrated by the lack of digital audio output on this deck. Although I don't listen to a lot of MD's anymore, this deck is my primary CD Player in my aging home audio rack (I love the 5-CD changer). This guide will depict my successful attempt to add S/PDIF TOSlink optical and coaxial digital audio output myself. Having read the "hacking" pages of Minidisc.org many years ago, I know there are still (as of this writing) How-To articles online for adding TOSLINK outputs to certain Minidisc decks which were not equipped with S/PDIF digital outputs from the factory (see links above). However, none of these articles described the MXD-D5C specifically. I thought the internal components might be similar enough that those earlier guides would be virtually identical to what I would carry out myself, but alas, this did not turn out to be the case. However, after studying the Sony MXD-D5C service manual schematics for a few days and having extended and extremely helpful online discussions with sonyinsider.com forum administrator and fellow MXD deck owner Stephen sfbp, I was finally able to discover that getting the digital outputs would ultimately be quite easy. I am no electrical engineer, but am merely a tinkerer who likes to "hack upward" the things in my life which I feel can be upgraded with a bit of ingenuity. The "figuring out" part of the project was probably the most challenging aspect for myself, a non-EE hobbyist... followed closely by the rear-panel modifications in which I attempted to make the deck appear factory-equipped with digital outputs in the end. I had also initially hoped that I would be able to simply use one digital output for both MD and CD digital audio streams. However, not only was there no single connectable point where both CD and MD SPDIF digital audio signals would be autoswitched according to the transport in use, it was also impossible to mix the two circuits into one output cable (I did test this). With this knowledge, I decided to go all-out and make optical and coaxial connections for both MD and CD transports for maximum connective flexibility, bringing the total number of digital audio outputs to four. Some of the materials I was able to easily find at my local Radio Shack retail store. Some parts I already had lying around, but the TOSlink transmitters TOTX177AL had to come from a specific online source (http://www.digikey.com/). More on these parts soon. Here is a fairly comprehensive parts list for this mod: 1x Sony MXD-D5C Minidisc Recorder / 5-CD Changer Deck: 1x Sony MXD-D5C Service Manual 2x Toshiba TOTX177AL(F,T) TOSlink Transmitting Modules with integrated dust flap and screw-mount hole (order a couple extra - you will be soldering directly onto these inexpensive but delicate components. 10+ Qty. discount): Digi-Key Corporation (TOTX177AL Data Sheet) 1x 4-pack RCA Phono Panel-mount Jacks (only 2 jacks used): Radio Shack 1x 4-Position Dual-Row Barrier Strip: Radio Shack 2x 2-pack 0.1µF Ceramic Disc Capacitor (4 capacitors total needed) (cap code "104"): Radio Shack 1x 5-Pack 1/8-Watt 330 Ohm Carbon Film Resistors (2 resistors needed) (color code "orange-orange-brown / gold"): Radio Shack 1x 5 Pack 1/8-Watt 150 Ohm Carbon-Film Resistors (2 resistors needed) (color code "brown-green-brown / gold"): Radio Shack 2x 22-18 AWG 1/4" Female Disconnects: Radio Shack (size needs confirmed) 2x 22-18 AWG #6 Stud Size Insulated Ring Terminal: Radio Shack (size needs confirmed - it fits around the threaded base of the coax jack, and the inner diameter is 1/4" or about 7mm. Marked "2 - 6" on the part I used) 1x 16-Pack #6 Insulated Spade Terminal: Radio Shack (size needs confirmed - small, narrow spade connector, inner distance between prongs is slightly less than 4mm. Marked "1.25 - 3.5L" on the part I used) Heat-shrink tubing suitable for ~26 Gauge wire: Radio Shack 24" (60cm) x4 Colors (Red, Black, Yellow, White, etc.) 26AWG Multistrand wire (I used several 12V Power Extension Wires with Mini Pin and Socket connectors at either end, similar to these PC Fan Extension Cables at Newegg.com or even better, these Y-cables). 2x Size 8 0.5" (Very small) Steel Sequin Pins: Joann Fabric and Crafts. (Maybe there is a better true electronics component for this, but pins similar to these worked for me. Be sure you don't use a type with a plastic head, as you will be soldering directly to these very small pins). 1x 10-pack 6-32 x 1/2" Round Head Machine Screws and Nuts 1x 10-pack 6-32 x 1/2" Flat Head Machine Screws and Nuts 2x Small-diameter Round Head Sheet Metal Screws (sized appropriately for mounting the TOSlink transmitters) 1x Piece approx. 6"x2" x 1/16" or 1/32" thick Sheet Steel or Aluminum (I used a scrap pop-out drive bay cover to an old ATX PC case) Here are some tools and consumables I used for this project: Clean working space with plenty of good light Grounding Strap: Radio Shack Electronics and Hobby Miniature Soldering Iron Kit: Radio Shack 1oz. .015 diameter "High-Tech" Silver-Bearing Solder" Radio Shack 2 oz. Canister Non-Spill Rosin Soldering Paste Flux: Radio Shack Butane Micro-torch: Radio Shack Mini Diagonal Wire Cutters: Radio Shack Mini Needle-nose Pliers: Radio Shack Wire Stripper/Connector Crimping Tool: Radio Shack Dremel Rotary Tool with a stack of cut-off discs and an assortment of grinding wheels: Amazon.com 3M Scotch 23 0.75"x30' Pliable Rubber Splicing Tape: Amazon.com or Mouser.com Drill or Drill Press with an assortment of sharp metal-drilling bits Mini bench vise Scissors Tweezers Magnifying Glass Phillips and Flathead Screwdrivers etc. ****** Unplug your deck from power and audio connections and carefully bring it to your flat, clean and dry work area. Use a Phillips head screwdriver to unscrew the 6 black painted screws which affix the top cover to the deck. There are two black screws on the rear panel along the upper edge, two screws on the left panel of the deck, and two screws on the right panel as well. Set them aside in a safe place where they will not get lost: Carefully lift the top cover panel off of the deck and set it aside in a safe place where it will not get scratched or bent. Use caution when removing the top panel so as not to have the front edge bind up against the fragile front panel. The top panel is metal and has very sharp edges - handle it very carefully such that you do not cut yourself. The deck itself also has plenty of sharp edges as well. This is the first view of the inside of the MXD-D5C: We can clearly see the large CD-changer mechanism dominating the left side of the deck, while the right side houses the truly "mini" Minidisc transport mechanism, power transformer, Main Circuit Board, and the smaller Audio Board slightly above the Main Board at the rear. The smaller audio board is connected to the rear panel of the deck by three screws near each connector jack. Remove them and set them aside with the screws removed earlier. Unplug the white keyboard connector from the audio board by carefully lifting straight up so as not to bend or break the pins: Close-up view of the Audio Board's ribbon wire Connector CN305, which we will soon be tapping for digital audio signals: Very very carefully remove the audio board by gently squeezing the tips of the 2 plastic support prongs with mini-needlenose pliers and lifting the Audio Board up. Use extreme caution. You may wish to also carefully remove the ribbon cable from Connector CN305 such that the audio board may be set aside without flopping over in the way on it's own (the ribbon cable is delicate yet springy). Remember to always wear your anti-static strap and carefully handle this board only by its edges, never touching the electronic components which are soldered to it. Here is a close-up of the audio board after it has been removed from it's supports:
    1 point
  43. Congrats adept777! I hope it reaches you quickly and in great condition!
    1 point
  44. Hi, for the people interested, there is a tool which allows you to recover your old SonicStage music library after a Windows re-installation or computer crash. It requires that you have a backup of the files in the directory "C:\Program Files\Common Files\Sony Shared\OpenMG". If you still have these from your old Windows installation and you have a collection of .oma files which you cannot access anymore due to a corrupt SonicStage installation and the fact that files are encrypted, then this tool will allow you to decrypt these files again. It comes with a readme file. http://rapidshare.com/files/444508273/openmg_20110125.zip This tool was not written by me but I compiled it and provided a readme. I simply provide the link to allow people to restore their encrypted SonicStage music library with .oma files (PCM and ATRAC3/3+). For all people who do not have a backup of the files in the aforementiond OpenMG directory anymore, you might be happy to hear that VLC is going to be able to playback such encrypted files in near future. Coming in late summer 2011, VLC will feature an ATRAC3+ decoder plus a decryptor for the .oma files. Adrian
    1 point
  45. does anyone know of a company that "presses" or "duplicates" your audio to a minidisc that is not recordable. I have seen a few artists have pre-recorded md's, and I'd like to do a run myself but doesn't look like that exists.
    1 point
  46. I am not economically forced to stay with MD, I just like it. Yes, I sometimes do have to make "excuses," although people either don't ask or those who know me have just given up trying to understand. If I had to start all over again today? I likely would not even look at MD, but no matter, I'm there. I love it, and what's done is done. Had I the ability to do so, there are far more important things in my life (looking back) that I would change. But I can't change those, either! 16:9 CRT TV, 32" (1/2 depth LG, bought just before tube TVs pretty much went the way of....MD?) ;-) I like the flat screen, though. I don't know what the UK car refs mean; however, I'm still driving a manny trans 5-speed (4-cyl Ford Escape, 2006) and I hope to never give up doing my own gear shifting. Give me minidisc, a stick shift and a Hi-def CRT and there's nothin' I can't do! ;-)
    1 point
  47. ive had the walkman x for about 4 weeks now and i love it but does anybody know if sony is going to release a firmware update for it because it really needs one.
    1 point
  48. Just having Type-R is not enough for a unit to sound good. A good amp is also required. Preferably of the analogue kind, e.g., TOSHIBA TA2131FL used in some pre-HiMD units (NH600/NH700/NHF800 are equipped with TOSHIBA TA2131FLG).
    1 point
  49. Hey MoV1, how did you reset your recorder? I've been playing around with the service mode on my MZ-N707 and fixing large errors is getting to be a pain. How can you reset the whole system, using an NV Reset? i thought that only did power stuff...
    1 point
×
×
  • Create New...