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  1. Windows 10 installation (Net MD): 1) Download the files in description 2) Double click on "SS43_Ultimate.exe" and install the "SonicStage" program. 3) Go to Program Files (x86) -> Sony -> Personal Audio Drivers -> Sort by type -> Highlight all the ".inf" files, right click on one of them and hit install. 4) Unzip the second attached file "sony-net-md-drivers-win764.zip" and open up the folder "Sony Net MD Drivers". 5) Right click "NETMD760.inf" and hit install. 6) Go to Program Files (x86) -> Sony -> SonicStage-> Right click on "Omgjbox.exe -> Click on Compatibility -> Under the Compatibility tab, click the box and select "Windows XP (Service Pack 3)" Launch SonicStage, plug in your Walkman and a "NET MD" tab should show up in Sonic Stage. If the "NET MD" tab does not show up for you, then you need to find the correct driver for the individual Microdisc player You may receive an error when starting it, just click "next" and agree" and open it up a 2nd time without problems. Learning how to use SonicStage is very easy. SS43_ULTIMATE.exe sony-net-md-drivers-win764.zip
    8 points
  2. Since the "Ultimate" 4.3 version seems to have gained quite a popularity, and appears to be less glitchy than any previous one, I decided to build a second release. This is purely a cosmetic update. What's changed from the first release: 1. Updated Registry Information Setup is used now. This doesn't affect minidisc functionality in any way, but may add support for some newer ATRAC phones (you still need to provide the respective drivers). 2. The link to Minidisc Community Forums in the Help menu is replaced with a link to Sony Insider Forums. 3. Installation package extraction path is no longer saved to registry. 4. Windows Installer 2.0 distribution package is not included. The complete list of changes from the official VAIO version (including changes introduced in the first release): 1. System prerequisites from Microsoft (Windows Installer 2.0, DirectX 9.0c, Windows Media Format 9, Windows Media Format 9.5, Data Access Components 2.5) are not included. 2. OpenMG Secure Module version 5.0 with the respective Registry Information is used instead of the original patched version 4.7. 3. Sony CONNECT Store support is no longer installed. 4. SonicStage Security Update is installed automatically. 5. Latest Personal Audio Drivers for SONY devices are installed automatically. 6. The VAIO support link in the Help menu is replaced with a link to Sony Insider Forums. NOTE: If you have applied the experimental SonicStage patch 4.3.02 for Vista/Windows 7, you'll need to re-apply it after installation. Download links: SonicStage 4.3 "Ultimate" Release 2 for Windows 2000/XP/Vista (you must register at Sony Insider forums to download) Mini-mode skins Recommended PxEngine update
    6 points
  3. Hello everyone! I'm new to this forum, and let me say that I love to see the love and conversation about MiniDisc keep going on I'm popping in just to let you know that I've recently released an app for NetMD devices. I wrote the app mainly for myself, but I thought it might be useful for some of you too! So, and here's the link to use it -> https://stefano.brilli.me/webminidisc/ And here's a short demo of how app works Any feedback is welcome! Stefano
    5 points
  4. As promised in one of my previous posts, here is the trailer for 'The Field Recordist' which features some of the mini disc recorders, together with recorded tracks: UPDATED - HERE IS THE COMPLETE FILM: Best heard with headphones.
    4 points
  5. Finally, my homebrew laser power meter is put together. It cost $3 worth of surface mount components, a used disc sacrificed for the shell, a piece of pcb, and some other stuff I found in the back of my drawer. Initially I tested it with my digital multimeter hooked on those test terminals, but then I found this neat little five-digit Volt-meter I bought some time ago on ebay, I think it was five bucks or so with free shipping from China. Without much fine tuning, I popped this little probe into all the decks I had at hand, and measured the laser power. From the mV readings and the nominal laser power values I calculated the mV-to-mW multipliers, and I took the average of a unit I trusted the most, a 940. Using this sole multiplier as the "calibration", I recalculated the measured mW figures and compared to the factory recommended range. Most of the other units were nicely within specification, but this 530 in question, that immediately popped out, being near 40% below the necessary values, i.e., 0,55 mW and 4,32 mW versus 0,9 mW and 7,0 mW respectively. Now, it might be that easy, but before changing anything, I want to check the IOP, to see, whether that meets the specs, and set the measured value for further adjustments. For this I will need that rig connecting to the drive, currently waiting for the special connector to arrive. So much for now, I will update the thread as I progress. Some photos attached below, just for fun.
    3 points
  6. Nice to see SIF back up. Why was it down? It was quite a long time. I think many people have given up on it. That http://www.minidisc.wiki has turned out pretty nice btw. Still has a ways to go, but it has data on some devices not found anywhere else in English.
    2 points
  7. I don't have a question, just wanted to post a brief "ode" to my Sony MZ-R90 which I got, unexpectedly, as a birthday present in 2000. It transformed portable audio for me, but six short months later, my MZ-R90 was stolen by an opportunistic thief. Not long after that, I moved on to MP3 players, but just recently I have been reminiscing wistfully about that beautiful little piece of music technology. I had the black version, and I think the industrial design is really magnificent.
    2 points
  8. Hi Folks, Long time no post, busy with child rearing. :-) I do stop by to read up on new posts and topics. I ran across this video on YouTube yesterday, sorry to post if everyone has already seen it but it was good to see and I wanted to share with all. Cheers!
    2 points
  9. It is currently admitted that the MZ-RH1 has the best DAC, ergo the best sound. I prefer however the sound of QS and ES Sony decks.
    2 points
  10. Hi all! So I've started a little project for myself. Minidisc never really caught on too well in canada so I won't be stmbling on any racks at the thrift shop anytime soon. I've been looking for storage solutions, haven't been a big fan of the wine box idea, generally I haven't seen anything that really caught my eye. For some reason it never dawned on me in the last year to 3D print some racks... I'm not sure why, I've been 3D printing everything else for years.... So I designed these up yesterday with some spare time. They're very rough still and very utilitarian. The larger one holds 10 discs and is meant to stack vertically (and has holes for nesting feet, and holes for screws). The smaller one to the right I haven't tested yet but I am thinking of a wall unit that makes the discs look like they are floating out of the wall. Edit wise I'm going to shrink the width by 2mm and perhaps put the discs at a slight downard angle rather than 90 degree so that if they were on an uneven surface, they'd still stay in the rack. What do you guys think? Feel free to toss any ideas my way! (also, for curiosity sake, the larger one took 8 hours to print! 3d printing is pretty cool but it's still a very slow process.) (The render) and printed
    2 points
  11. I got the drivers installed on my computer. I recommend watching this youtube video thats how i did it.
    2 points
  12. In case anyone is interested... I´ve written a review of the Sony MZ-R 50. http://marlene-d.blogspot.de/2013/07/the-legendary-sony-mz-r-50-review.html
    2 points
  13. I just wanted to say that it is nice to have some new members who are clearly MD lovers around to join in on the discussion and add new thoughts, ideas and opinions. Welcome all. :-)
    2 points
  14. Buy LIP-4 battery. First open all the cover of LIP-4. then you can small PCB. just remove the PCB using soldering iron or else. Do the same things with LIP-3 batteries. take the small PCB from LIP-3 and put to LIP-4 battery cell use soldering iron. Then cover you new battery, make sure it won't have electronics shortcuts. You'll have a new long lasting battery. It works on my MZ-N10.
    2 points
  15. I have a Sony MDS-JE780 for sale. It is silver and in mint condition as it has been hardly used. It is based in Wolverhampton so can be collected, or can be posted at additional cost. (I estimate about £7 with recorded delivery) £80 ono. Spec taken from the Sony website: Hybrid Pulse D/A Converter ATRAC DSP Type-S Long Time Recording and Playback (LP2, LP4) Pitch Control Scale Factor Edit NetMD Control A1 Keyboard Terminal 1 x Optical & 1 x Coaxial Input & 1 x Optical Output Available inblack and silverSee the link for more info.... http://www.sony.co.u...=TechnicalSpecs
    2 points
  16. MiniDisc is not useless; it's obsolete. There is a key difference. Nothing as multifaceted as a MiniDisc recorder can be said to be useless. That said, I think that even if Sony had marketed MiniDisc successfully, it would be obsolescent today because its competitors are more feature-rich. I have difficulty following some of the logic in this thread. MiniDisc and MP3 players both have shuffle functions. It's up to the user whether or not to use them, and absolutely nothing about an MP3 player compels one to do so. It SHOULD go without saying that either is just as capable of playing entire albums chronologically. You're arguing against your perceptions of MP3 users' supposed preferences, which are likely exaggerated and unfounded. The issue was the native functionality of the devices and which better suited the questioner. I still have my MiniDisc players, though I almost exclusively use my MP3 player (and never on shuffle). I may be returning to reporting soon and thus would use my MiniDisc to record, even though my MP3 player has a voice recorder. I also take out MiniDisc sometimes just for nostalgia. Whereas many of you are exalting album listening, I actually got into MiniDisc because it facilitated playlists, but now MP3 players do this better because the track need not be re-uploaded to form the playlist. Album listening has its advantages and purposes, but playlists demonstrate the user's creativity and make for great time travel. In my moments of nostalgia, I can call up playlists of the songs that defined eras I miss. It's a beautiful thing. One of you said you found MP3 players useless because they could not do all the things a MiniDisc player could. That depends on the MP3 player. (Further, it's a bogus statement because any mass storage device that plays music clearly has a twofold desirable purpose.) I actually can edit titles and move files on the go, but let's be honest: It is rare that such an act is of such pressing import that it can't wait until one gets home. My MP3 player is an Archos 5, which, like many MP3 players, has great sound quality, radio, a 250-gigabyte hard drive, a voice recorder, Wi-FI, Web radio and TV, DVR, picture display, and video. Useless because it's an MP3 player? Oh, brother. Much of this stems from your zeal to vindicate the MiniDisc, which I love. Another example is the citation of an intangible such as "cool factor," which lies in the eye of the beholder. Consider that being in the in-crowd like an Apple user can be said to be cool. Also, cool as in different just means anything opposed to the leading product, and that doesn't necessarily mean a MiniDisc. A lesser-known MP3 player can turn heads, but turning heads is not where the joy in product use lies. It is also flawed logic to assert that one likes MiniDisc because one prefers to carry around just a few albums. One can choose to listen to just a few on an MP3 player, first of all. The mere presence of all the other tracks you have neatly stored on the hard drive will not weigh heavily on the mind. Second, both MP3 players and MiniDiscs are mass storage devices. That's like one compulsive overeater defaming another because the other is even worse. That does not make you the icon of restraint; rather, you prefer a lesser example of excess. I do believe there still are real advantages to MiniDisc that relate to its native functionality. It's durable, sounds great, and records. It edges out MP3 in battery life, line-in recording, and usually voice recording. Actually, recording is where its greatest strength is now. Another strength is that different models are tailored to different uses; some have radio, some record and others have a digital amplifier, for instance. I love that my MP3 player works with Windows Media Player, which keeps track of the tracks you have and have not added to the device. Syncing automatically adds the new tracks. If I went back to MinDisc, I'd have to guess where I left off as I tried to upload all the music I have purchased since then to MiniDiscs. Also, I don't have to be bothered with SonicStage or ATRAC anymore, and I am glad. I don't have a second-generation Hi-MD player, so I can't put MP3s on them.
    2 points
  17. I have an N510 and a DN430. Both sound really good. I also have some S1's which, I know, are type R. They both sound excellent to me. I figured I'd take the (possible) slight noise quality hit and lack of remote for bombproof (especially in Orygun) performance of the S1. I can say those DN430's sound just fine. I think you can find that model with a radio too
    2 points
  18. The MiniDiscs I most enjoy stumbling across are the ones where I’d made an unlabelled (except for possibly noting the month/year) “mixtape” back in the day and being reminded of a point in time. It’s interesting being reminded of what I’d been listening to in, say, May 2001 or August 1998.
    1 point
  19. Here is the thing then: the 640 does work now with PC-Link and M-Crew. (See my uncut, lame video at the end - "Welcome to Paradise" :-) .) Yes, it is done, and I feel this is a breakthrough, after all those unsuccessful tries in the past, including my previous attempts back in 2017 or so. The icing on the cake is the 640 has kept all its keyboard functionalities too ! I guess what you are mostly interested in is how this was made possible, and what's needed to replicate it on your machines - the shiny, polished, step-by-step guide and documentation I originally wanted to post here can wait. The beauty is that it's like Columbus' egg. Plain and simple, and all of you will now say "gosh, I should have done this easily". [I had not reinvented the wheel either, really. What I did was I took the recently purchased S50's main board I did not fear to sacrifice and began doing actual measurements of what lines/signals go where, what connections, pull-up resistors, etc. are there, and compared the thing to the SM-s. The big surprise came when I realized none of the SM-s (640, S50, PC3, etc.) tell you the true story, because this or that is different here and there, from what is on paper and what is actually on the board. Looked too complex, and I got misled quite a few times when working only from the SM-s.] I distilled all this information down to a simple, clean solution. No matter which version you have (EU, US/CAN, etc.), just follow this: [In a nutshell: there is nothing special required, everything is there already in the machine (this was my theory afterall, and it finally stood). Very minor things must be checked and supplemented, but nothing that could not be done DIY.] Check this silly drawing: These are the lines (marked with green) that must be there, all the way from the PS2 socket down to the MCU (other lines are all there, nothing to do with them). Follow these lines on your actual boards/wires one by one and see if you can get there all along. If there are jumper wires and/or 0 ohm resistors and/or inductances in series, leave them there. If you see some pull-up (typically 4k7 or 10k) and/or pull-down resistors (typically 100k) or parallel capacitors, you can also leave them all there. If the continuity breaks somewhere, look after what is missing. What must be there in order to get this working, i.e., must be supplemented in case they are missing (and normally are - see my photos with the details below): - R36 and R37 (very tiny 0 Ohm resistors) are not populated on the main board (@sfbp, you have been this close, all the rest you did well!), - two wires are missing, from CN820 on the MB up to the keyboard pcb (as seen also on @sfbp's photos), making sure you solder them in proper order (do not accidentally swap them), and - two 100 ohm resistors need to be soldered on the keyboard PCB in the positions marked "L805" and "L806" (well, plain jumper wires would also work, but in some PC-Link models these serial resistances are there, for a reason I guess). (Warning: - when measuring traces on and wires between pcb-s, don't just use your DMM directly in resistance or continuity mode. See more on this here.) - make sure you and your device are properly ESD protected, and never work on a powered up machine.) This is it, and you're done. I would love to see then the feedback from people who succesfully replicated this on their machines. - - - Next steps that now are also doable using the same approach: - for "technical maximalism": build the I2C extender circuit mentioned above (good news: the keyboard PCB is already prepared just needs to be populated, and only THT parts are required), - probably the "most wanted" one: make the 940 work like the Japanese version, PC-Link and keyboard, - a "side effect": make the keyboard work on the S50 (and on the 470 too) - similary to the I2C buffer, the MB pcb already has this area, just unpopulated, - and an "opportunity" for the low end machines: make the 440 (!) work with PC-Link and even accept a keyboard too. And some mandatory, due thanks: - @kgallen - I value your attitude for getting things done quickly (like in the case of the copybit killer stuff). This pushed me out of my "laziness". - @sfbp - your photo gave me the final "kick" that my hypothesis was right, and that I had to finish my research and do the soldering part at last. When I saw your 640's main board, I immediately realized why your attempt was unsuccessful. (And I asked for some new photos because this very part was hardly visible caused by the bright spot of the flash, but then I came across finally even without them.) - @Sony - having these features already built in (only disguised for certain markets ...) MOV01439.MPG
    1 point
  20. Confirmation that the BCA-NWHD3 adapter also works with the NH1. It also works for power/charging when a 6V adapter is connected.
    1 point
  21. I like your approach, Kevin, and yes, on the low voltage DC side the regulator circuits should be OK with even a 15...20% higher input voltage. However, the main risk here is at the transformer side. Not sure about Sony, but in the commercial goods world it is common to squeeze out the most possible performance using the least possible material. When it comes to an AC power transformer, we speak about a lot of iron and copper to be saved. Then, when you consider how a transformer works, a 10...20% increase in the AC voltage can result a much higher increase in the energy "pumped" into the transformer, and that "extra" converts to different kind of losses (iron core loss, copper wire loss, etc.), and ultimately, heat. Normally, such a transformer is designed to work near the limit of possible magnetic saturation of the core, to keep the size (= cost of the material) small. If you go over this limit, that's when problems happen. Same for the copper windings: the diameter of the wire is designed to bear the maximum current that particular device is expected to draw. But if you increase the voltage, with the same copper resistance, the current will increase, so will the heat generated inside the copper. On top of all, this is a non-linear function :-( . I.e., 10% more current (or voltage) means 20+ % more energy, and 20% more current means 40+ % more energy. We did not speak about electric and magnetic (also, audible) noises of an over-saturated transformer, or voltage swings on the AC net, that can take the input AC voltage way higher, than the nominal value. Example: it is not uncommon on the 230V grids, that the voltage occassionally goes up to 238...242V. I believe it is similar on the 100/110/120V grids too. Imagine, if a device meant to be used on a 100V line gets a - say - 125...126V AC input voltage on a 120V net.
    1 point
  22. I haven't visited this forum in years, but driving home today I felt a sense of yearning for years gone by. I got home, popped in a frozen pizza and dug out my Sony MZ-NF610. I dug through an electronics drawer and found the RM-MC37LT remote that came with it, popped in Pink Floyd Animals and MARVELED....ABSOLUTELY MARVELED at the experience. What sound quality, I didn't even have to look at the buttons on the remote, they were intuitive like shifting a 5 speed. I swapped through headphones, first the efficient Koss and Grado RS-2, then the Senn 650's. Not quite enough power from the Sony to run the Senn's so I dug out another relic...a CMOY Penguin Amp made by Robert Gehrke in Germany. What a great experience tonight! I would not sell my gear for anything! A night to cherish really.
    1 point
  23. The 333ES is so good, that its LP2 sounds good even without Type S. I got one when they were more reasonably priced, but it's now deceased and departed. The JE780 is well-spoken-of and while not exactly common, does turn up here and there for much less than the 333ES. I'm not sure the S500 was ever common, even in Japan. Don't know where you're looking, but besides eBay, you can always check out Buyee (http://buyee.jp/?lang=en). Lots of folks record optically from their PCs! (I sometimes do so from an iMac...my PC has coax out...that works, too.) I have a JA22ES, which seems to have a GUI that enables one to do titling and such from a PC, although I do not use that functionality. Anyway, good luck, be nice to know what you wind up with.
    1 point
  24. The 14650 was higher capacity - but this causes no problems - a side benefit is longer playtime. - Also battery was quoted as having protection built in - however, I didn't bypass the existing circuit in the empty case - just inserted the new battery.
    1 point
  25. More for the scrappad - the venerable MZ-1. The original BP-1 batteries are mostly deceased now and had limited capability. One rough and ready solution is to acquire a couple of lithium rechargeables type 14650 and an appropriate charger (available on ebay for around £10/$15/15euro the lot). Find some high density polystyrene and use a hobby knife to cut out three blocks (two for shimming and one to hold the home made end connector). Double sided tape will hold the shims in place. Fashion an end connector to sit in the battery doorway and provide contact/pressure - a couple of brass paper fasteners will do as well as anything.(Push them through the polystyrene and join them together at the rear) The result - a functioning portable player with no damage or modification. Lithium batteries need special care over charging - so a word of warning - Never plug in the MZ-1 charger while lithium batteries are inserted - it can be a dangerous thing to do. Never short the batteries and always check polarity when inserting. Pictures should be self explanatory. Enjoy the resurrection of the dinosaur!
    1 point
  26. I've got Sonicstage Ultimate version 4.3 running happily on 3 Windows 7 machines (two 64 bit laptops and one 32 bit netbook). Touch wood and all, but I've never had any problems, including backups/authentication, most recently last weekend, with over 90GB/5000 tracks, and haven't had to resort to Phillppe's trick to get it work either. Installed the NetMD drivers and works fine with (Sony) NetMD as well as Hi-MD portables. Does a reasonable job as my main PC music player too.
    1 point
  27. dump it. if it has music on it of value you could give it a very good wash and dry but that would remove the lubricant on the disc so u wouldnt be able to use it to record any more - the record head is a magnetic one that actually contacts the disc, hence the lubricant. how on earth did u let fungus grow on it?. Dont let it get near any of your other ones - have a good look at them if it has to see if they are affected.
    1 point
  28. Do you plan on using any of them for music, or just to make money? If you want to know what things are worth to sell, them sell them and find out. If you are only selling them on eBay (and not just you), good luck to you - but how about not wasting the time of forum users by posting about them here WHEN THERE IS A DEDICATED CLASSIFIEDS SECTION that you people are completely disrespecting!! With all due respect, Danny
    1 point
  29. Added new photos on my picasa web site: blanks: maxell XL II Yellow, in the folder " rare brands " Intenso, Okano, Schneider. Machines: Victor XM C 11 red Victor XM C 31 pink in the next days more.... a nice day to all Sergio
    1 point
  30. Hi Guys Started a new site - all comments and feedback (good or bad) would be appreciated. It is at miniaudiobooks.co.uk. This is my first attempt at site building so be gentle with me. Cheers Norm
    1 point
  31. Hi. everybody. It's so long time no see. Recently, I have so busy in my country. Korea! (^^*);; And I have made some special RMP (real minidisc project.. I wish it will be a public noun to minidisc users..(^^*)) about mobile suit gundam's 30th anniversary CD. I want to make my own RMP, so I do. I have made this with photo paper and some styrofoam boards with sticker paper. And I use the axia minidisc..(^^*) It spend so long time but I really like it.. (^-^)
    1 point
  32. Here's an article I came across featuring Derek Morris and his use of Minidisc. http://www.boat-mag.com/2012/12/28/dj-derek/
    1 point
  33. I want to add to something about the tangible point. I don't like the invisible - I like to interact with my music - which is why I don't really have any music stored as mp3s - rather just CDs and vinyl. But ironically for me it doesn't just mean physical - as peculiar a concept I think of duration and the time spent in the moment as a tangible concept as well. You hear a lot these days about the lost art of the mix tape. I had a discussion about it with my significant other last night, as I heard yesterday Billy Joe Armstrong (Green Day) recently bought a cassette recorder to return to the format. I suggested that making a mix tape meant more because it took 90 mins to make. That it wasn't just about the song choice, but those 3.5 mins it takes to record each song. During those moments, you're both thinking about the next song, but also imagining how the recipient will feel when listening to it - there's so much more time to get wrapped up in all the emotions that go with a mix tape. Obviously the words tape and minidisc are interchangeable here - if they're both being made in real-time. She argued, rightly so, that you can replicate that experience with playlists - e.g. on Spotify or in iTunes - and that it doesn't just have to be a silent experience of dragging song titles into a playlist without listening. Whilst it's inarguable, I just never find myself doing that. It's funny, when i had my R30, I was the only person I knew who had one. I made mix tapes for people, but I'd actually "master" them on the R30 - much easier to reorganise after the fact before committing to tape. Tape does get a bad rap though. Obviously not up to the standard of MD, but a good deck with a good tape could reach pretty great heights.
    1 point
  34. 1. How old were you when you first 'bought into' the format? 44. 2. Do you still regularly use your very first player? No, broke. 3. Do you regularly 'use' your items, or are some purely of interest as a 'collector'? Bit of both, couple of models have become favourites so they are used all the time. Those with peculiar obsolete batteries (e.g. Aiwa AM-F70) just sit on a shelf. 4. Do you listen to 'new' music on your discs, or prefer to keep the format for music 'of the era'? Any music. 5. Do you own more items than you can 'practically use'? Yes. 6. Did you 'go away' from MiniDisc', only to return to it at a later date? No, stuck with it ever since my first one. 7. Do you associate use of your player with 'fond memories', or is it a purely 'practical' consideration? Practical, if I use my MP3 player for a few days then go back to MD the improvement in sound quality is like a breath of fresh air. I've often wondered where the majority of regular MD users are located and it wouldn't surprise me if it's here in the UK. As a nation we traditionally tend to be more resistant to change than other countries so therefore hang on to old technology for longer. Good luck with your research.
    1 point
  35. I´ll try: he didn´t buy the most expensive MDs. What that means I have no idea. Maybe he wasn´t interested that much in haptic quality. Or he simply didn´t care. He´s an orderly person, titling his MDs. The music he likes... well, he does have taste. Blur, Ella Fitzgerald, Daft Punk and Faithless. Clubmusic, jazz, alternative rock. On occasion he experiments with different styles like Dido or Elvis Costello... or Boyzone (!). There´s also an MD especially made for cooking. Either for a girlfriend or for himself... Some MDs are not titled by him but by another person, judging from differing styles of writing on several MDs. Which could mean that he convinced someone else to invest into MD or that he was convinced. I cannot see very much I´m afraid, except stating the obvious.
    1 point
  36. I'm just curious, when doing CD -> MD optical recordings, which will produce better MD recordings: portable MD Type-R recorder or MD home deck Type-R recorder? I've heard the using MD decks can produce better recordings because of the available power for computing/encoding/compressing. If a bit is a bit (0 or 1), wouldn't the sound quality be the same no mattery which Type-R recorder you use? Thanks.
    1 point
  37. This is a common fault on that model - do not buy it. In most cases it is caused by the soldered connections on the audio amplifier chip, which break regularly. it can be repaired quite easily, but there is no point buying a recorder that needs repair if a good working unit is available elsewhere. it is not a repair you can do yourself. In which country do you live? Jim
    1 point
  38. Hi macbob. It is highly unlikely to be the write head or its cable at fault. In my experience faults such as this are caused by the optical pickup assembly on Hi-MD recorders. And replacement is a very delicate job. The disc may or may not play back on another unit - it depends on the nature of the problem. But it is certainly worth trying before reformatting it. Jim
    1 point
  39. its in the options in sonic stage. i cant remember where but just look around in the pull down menus its easy to find.
    1 point
  40. Msteein, I have both the AT 822 and just picked up the AT 8022 this week to compare. They are both excellent stereo condenser mikes. I have gotten many great sounding recordings from my 822 both in my studio and in field settings like jazz clubs or in one instance on a subway platform. Audio Technia is no longer making the 822 but, it can still be found pretty easily with a Google search. That said, the 8022 is considered the alternative to the 822. Both mikes come with two sets of cords, one set with left and right quarter inch plugs for use with a mixer or other professional level equipment and another cord that terminates to an eighth inch stereo plug for going directly into the mike input of a minidisc recorder or such. I am finding that for the same price as the 822, at B&H anyway, the 8022 is in fact an even better sounding mike. wider dynamic range, less flat sounding...brighter and wider sounding. I would actually like to sell one of my 822s (I have two) and get a second 8022. In another topic on the forum called Live Recording I posted a link to some A/B comparison recordings between the 822 and a Sony mike called an ECM-MS957, a very expensive and awful sounding mike. The thread is called Live Recording Using MD and Transferring To CD by Samantha D. I'm pretty sure my links are still active. I'll try to upload and post a link for an A/B comparison between the AT822 and the AT8022 and that mike that comes with the M200, that DS70P. The difference will amaze you. I sympathize about the cost of a high quality microphone but, having a high quality digital recorder for mike recording is pointless unless you have a really good mike. That is the first link in creating the signal that will be recorded. And remember that all live recordings start as an analog signal. If your mike is low quality, the results on you high tech recorder will be disappointing. The DS70P is really best suited for recording speaking, not music. I'll try to get that link set up soon for you. Best, -J
    1 point
  41. At this point I might start to do a few things with a single non-behaving MP3. a. does it play (and does it play without getting modified) in normal players other than SS? b. can you install another SS on another PC and import that one file there? I realise that's a problem for many people. c. Have you checked that the library is stored on a medium where there is lots of WRITEABLE storage before doing the import? The fact you have several "optimized files" folders suggests to me that you have stored the db under a single user (and maybe for several users). Consequently it will be inaccessible to other users through Windows AC lists. I would consider carefully the benefits of having only a single place for SS database, NOT under your My Documents tree. Did you upgrade to SP3? Rumour has it that some of the Vista UAL stuff got snuck in there in the interests of "security". Sony has always insisted you have to be more than a plain-joe user when running SS. Perhaps you got away with it but now restrictions on access are being enforced. Yup, time to start looking at ACL's. Sorry. oh yes, one more thing. Time to talk to the resident genius Avrin. The db is a real Microsoft Access db. Somehow maybe the permissions got munged?
    1 point
  42. I believe that the Onkyo decks are still being built as well. Bob
    1 point
  43. Agree about the NH600, but only up to a point. Outside the UK (where you can easily get an NH700) the NH600 has much better availability. If you look at the service manuals for NH600,NH700(incl. NHF800) and NH900 you will see they all share a common mechanism, so, features aside, you're getting basically the same product. The big trick when buying an NH600x machine is to ask the vendor how many sockets/connectors it has. I have seen (and/or seen pictures of) many variations. My own 600D purchased here in N.America has no line in, and NO 3V POWER CONNECTOR (the yellow hole that takes the yellow-tipped jack from Sony and other suitable adaptors). This might be a big deal for you, or it might not. The rationale is that the device doesn't really need power at all as long as it can draw some from USB, during downloading. The NH600, on the other hand, has a nice power input, and a WHITE socket for line-in (analogue/optical) as well as the usual USB socket and remote-connector. Don't let weird pictures put you off, my strong belief is that they ALL have the right socket for the "standard" Sony remote control. Note one big difference of the NH600 from the higher numbered (in this case bigger number = better) models - it cannnot recharge the NiMH battery when you press the stop button. Even if there's a yellow connector. However this shouldn't stop you as Energizer NiHM chargers and AA batteries are so cheap that there is no reason for anyone to buy anything expensive from Sony. It seems that many of the NH600's were made for outside the USA. Mine came from Oz, and of course any model from down under, or Europe will (if supplied at all) have a charger that needs 230V. Again not a big deal but don't be surprised if you get some funny shaped plug you can't do anything with. The jog dial is not as solid as it might be, and a little smaller for big fingers, but don't let that put you off. The 3-line screen is an excellent feature that older models never had. This is a nice machine, and perfectly adequate as backup to a microphone-capable RH910.
    1 point
  44. Why I can`t download drivers for my SHARP IM-DR410 from "downloads"?
    1 point
  45. I like how they wrap up the discs so well, it almost makes it delicious enough to eat. And then with the fancy writing and pictures and all that colour makes you just want to buy some more discs. What would be cooler is if they had made discs with the shell made out of brushed aluminum, it would look beautiful and classy. I would buy a pack of 10 regardless of price.
    1 point
  46. Thx for the replies. Is an output of 0.7A for a charger considered high for a Sony battery? I asked this because I've heard somewhere that the charge should be around 200-400 mA.
    1 point
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