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  1. Windows 10 installation (Net MD): 1) Download the files in description 2) Double click on "SS43_Ultimate.exe" and install the "SonicStage" program. 3) Go to Program Files (x86) -> Sony -> Personal Audio Drivers -> Sort by type -> Highlight all the ".inf" files, right click on one of them and hit install. 4) Unzip the second attached file "sony-net-md-drivers-win764.zip" and open up the folder "Sony Net MD Drivers". 5) Right click "NETMD760.inf" and hit install. 6) Go to Program Files (x86) -> Sony -> SonicStage-> Right click on "Omgjbox.exe -> Click on Compatibility -> Under the Compatibility tab, click the box and select "Windows XP (Service Pack 3)" Launch SonicStage, plug in your Walkman and a "NET MD" tab should show up in Sonic Stage. If the "NET MD" tab does not show up for you, then you need to find the correct driver for the individual Microdisc player You may receive an error when starting it, just click "next" and agree" and open it up a 2nd time without problems. Learning how to use SonicStage is very easy. SS43_ULTIMATE.exe sony-net-md-drivers-win764.zip
    9 points
  2. Since the "Ultimate" 4.3 version seems to have gained quite a popularity, and appears to be less glitchy than any previous one, I decided to build a second release. This is purely a cosmetic update. What's changed from the first release: 1. Updated Registry Information Setup is used now. This doesn't affect minidisc functionality in any way, but may add support for some newer ATRAC phones (you still need to provide the respective drivers). 2. The link to Minidisc Community Forums in the Help menu is replaced with a link to Sony Insider Forums. 3. Installation package extraction path is no longer saved to registry. 4. Windows Installer 2.0 distribution package is not included. The complete list of changes from the official VAIO version (including changes introduced in the first release): 1. System prerequisites from Microsoft (Windows Installer 2.0, DirectX 9.0c, Windows Media Format 9, Windows Media Format 9.5, Data Access Components 2.5) are not included. 2. OpenMG Secure Module version 5.0 with the respective Registry Information is used instead of the original patched version 4.7. 3. Sony CONNECT Store support is no longer installed. 4. SonicStage Security Update is installed automatically. 5. Latest Personal Audio Drivers for SONY devices are installed automatically. 6. The VAIO support link in the Help menu is replaced with a link to Sony Insider Forums. NOTE: If you have applied the experimental SonicStage patch 4.3.02 for Vista/Windows 7, you'll need to re-apply it after installation. Download links: SonicStage 4.3 "Ultimate" Release 2 for Windows 2000/XP/Vista (you must register at Sony Insider forums to download) Mini-mode skins Recommended PxEngine update
    6 points
  3. Hello everyone! I'm new to this forum, and let me say that I love to see the love and conversation about MiniDisc keep going on I'm popping in just to let you know that I've recently released an app for NetMD devices. I wrote the app mainly for myself, but I thought it might be useful for some of you too! So, and here's the link to use it -> https://stefano.brilli.me/webminidisc/ And here's a short demo of how app works Any feedback is welcome! Stefano
    5 points
  4. As promised in one of my previous posts, here is the trailer for 'The Field Recordist' which features some of the mini disc recorders, together with recorded tracks: UPDATED - HERE IS THE COMPLETE FILM: Best heard with headphones.
    4 points
  5. Hello! Just thought I'll report it here, if you're trying to create an account without a connection with an already existing account like Google or alike, it's simply impossible to do so, because of incorrectly loaded reCaptcha. To make this account I had to rewrite the part of the site responsible for the captcha. If anyone else is experiencing the same difficulties, here are the steps I used to create my account: Go to https://forums.sonyinsider.com/register/ In devtools, open the `head` tag and remove all the scripts that mention recaptcha Add a new script, with `src="https://www.google.com/recaptcha/api.js"` Execute the following JavaScript code: const captcha = document.querySelector("[data-ipscaptcha]"); const parent = captcha.parentElement; captcha.remove(); const newCaptcha = document.createElement("div"); parent.appendChild(newCaptcha); grecaptcha.ready(() => grecaptcha.render(newCaptcha, {sitekey: "6LdgERMTAAAAAC4kTmm7BH1laShX3teATAV_6FIY"})); After that, you should be able to click on the captcha and create your account by executing the following JS code (the submit button is broken): document.querySelector("form").submit();
    3 points
  6. Finally, my homebrew laser power meter is put together. It cost $3 worth of surface mount components, a used disc sacrificed for the shell, a piece of pcb, and some other stuff I found in the back of my drawer. Initially I tested it with my digital multimeter hooked on those test terminals, but then I found this neat little five-digit Volt-meter I bought some time ago on ebay, I think it was five bucks or so with free shipping from China. Without much fine tuning, I popped this little probe into all the decks I had at hand, and measured the laser power. From the mV readings and the nominal laser power values I calculated the mV-to-mW multipliers, and I took the average of a unit I trusted the most, a 940. Using this sole multiplier as the "calibration", I recalculated the measured mW figures and compared to the factory recommended range. Most of the other units were nicely within specification, but this 530 in question, that immediately popped out, being near 40% below the necessary values, i.e., 0,55 mW and 4,32 mW versus 0,9 mW and 7,0 mW respectively. Now, it might be that easy, but before changing anything, I want to check the IOP, to see, whether that meets the specs, and set the measured value for further adjustments. For this I will need that rig connecting to the drive, currently waiting for the special connector to arrive. So much for now, I will update the thread as I progress. Some photos attached below, just for fun.
    3 points
  7. I received a similar, albeit slightly smaller, mix of boxed and unboxed discs today too 🙂
    2 points
  8. Which sort of cases are you after? You used to be able to buy the basic hinged jewel cases from Amazon but I've not seen them on there for a few years now: If you're UK based Retro Style Media sell them: https://www.retrostylemedia.co.uk/product/clear-minidisc-case Price per case varies depending on how many you buy. Note that the quoted price is ex VAT so you'll need to factor that in as well. They also sell the larger cases that pre-recorded discs used to come in back in the 90s: They come in a variety of colours but are a lot more expensive. You can find them here: https://www.retrostylemedia.co.uk/shop/minidisc-cases That website also has templates to download for the inserts etc. There's a bit more info (and a video) here:
    2 points
  9. Don't worry about it - I got myself a Sony LAM for testing and ended up falling in love with the whole LAM series of devices. I have 3 now, so I use that functionality regularly 😆
    2 points
  10. Over the past couple of months, I've been bitten by the MD bug again. I hadn't visited this forum in a VERY long time. I've used one of my MZ-NH900s at my work desk on almost a daily basis for 10+ years. It sits it's original cradle, powered from the AC adapter because the battery long since gave up the ghost. I have about 20 disc's (a mix of Hi-MD and standard MD My other NH900 has been broken for years after it fell out of my pocket and a disc got jammed. Was able to get the disc out by disassembling the recorder but when I all went back together the buttons were no longer responsive... So I put it in a storage box with my other MD stuff that wasn't used anymore. FF 1month ago, I was digging thru some things and came across my box MD recorders. Pulled out the NH900 and took it apart again. Long story short, it's had been returned to service! While looking for info on repair, I came across this site and an intro to Reddit MD. My interest stoked again, burned some new disc's, reorganized some of my favorites, and am trying my hand at labeling. I've also managed to buy a couple of new Hi-MD blanks and some used standard MDs. It's always fun to go thru used disc's from someone else to see what's on them 🙂 My MD arsenal consists of: MZ-R500, MZ-N707 (eprom nodded), MZ-N920, IM-DR420, MZ-NH600D, 2-MZ-NH900s, 2-MZ-RH10s (both with bad displays), and a MZ-RH910. 150ish standard MDs and 15 Hi-MDs. Most of my standard disc's are Hi-MD formated and most of the music is burned in ATRAC3plus @256k. I simply LOVE this format!
    2 points
  11. Nice to see SIF back up. Why was it down? It was quite a long time. I think many people have given up on it. That http://www.minidisc.wiki has turned out pretty nice btw. Still has a ways to go, but it has data on some devices not found anywhere else in English.
    2 points
  12. I don't have a question, just wanted to post a brief "ode" to my Sony MZ-R90 which I got, unexpectedly, as a birthday present in 2000. It transformed portable audio for me, but six short months later, my MZ-R90 was stolen by an opportunistic thief. Not long after that, I moved on to MP3 players, but just recently I have been reminiscing wistfully about that beautiful little piece of music technology. I had the black version, and I think the industrial design is really magnificent.
    2 points
  13. Back in 1997, long before MP3 was anything more than a concept, I was serving in the Air Force and frequently deployed overseas. Some guys on the squadron introduced me to a strange format for making music portable. MiniDisc. I soon got to learn that those tough little discs survived the rough-and-tumble of life in a kit-bag. We each bought portable players, and would ‘pool’ our discs together to make little music libraries, would trade discs with one another, and would copy CD’s for one another back home. No matter where we were in the world, AA batteries were easy to obtain, and just a handful of batteries would literally last weeks. It was a pocket-sized bit of luxury that we could carry with us, and I loved it. ......then, along came MP3 players and the ubiquitous ‘iPod’. Suddenly we could carry all of our music in a small space, and it seemed that the MiniDisc was dead. Within about 3 years everyone I knew had ditched the format and were literally giving away their discs and players, as were oil-rig workers, fishermen, and other locals who worked away from home for extended periods. I too, confined my MiniDisc collection to a box in the loft, and bought an iPod Classic. Fast-forward to 2005, and I deployed for a 4-month tour to Iraq. My iPod came with me, and I had the small luxury of my music collection to fall back on, OR SO I THOUGHT. By the second week I had the sickening ‘Sync Reset’ display (which of course was impossible without my PC) and in one fell swoop I lost my music. Other guys had problems with the portable power-generators cooking their wall-plug chargers, and soon quite a few of us had lost the use of our players, just when we would have appreciated them the most! Back home, and I was quickly falling out of love with my iPod. It seemed that whenever I updated my collection there would be issues with mixed/missing title-tracks and artwork. Any albums entitled ‘Greatest Hits’ would become an amalgamated mess, and whilst the battery-life seemed to get ever shorter, the demands for a ‘sync reset’ increased. The love was fading. I noticed something else, too. My listening habits were changing. My seemingly endless access to music made me a lazy listener, and I would frequently jump from album to album, track to track, and would often skip mid-way through a track. My days of listening to an album the way that the artist intended, had gone. This wasn’t music enjoyment. ....and so, by 2008 I was back to my MiniDisc, and what I revival it was! Equipment that had previously been prohibitively expensive was now dirt-cheap, and I was living the hobby like a millionaire! I soon had units for every occasion with Sony JA20ES and JA50ES decks for hifi use, numerous portable players, and a Pioneer MEH P9000 head-unit for the car. I could afford to be extravagant with discs, and my well used dozen or so swelled up to over 1,000. That was 10 years ago, and nothing much since then has changed. I still indulge in the childhood enjoyment of putting a ‘mixtape’ together in real-time, copying music from my CD’s and vinyl to Type-R SP to listen to in the car, or out walking the dog. Because space is at a premium my playlists are more carefully considered, and I listen to each track in full. My listening-habits are back to where they should be. In 20 years I can count on one hand the number of corrupted discs I’ve suffered, only ever having to re-copy one album. I keep discs and a spare player at work, in the summerhouse and in the car, and I have a physical, tangible connection with my music collection again. MiniDisc as a commercial format is dead, and I’m OK with that. It continues to live on in my household, and probably will do for years to come, maybe even for another decade or more. I continue to love the ‘forgotten format’, and those robust little discs give me everything I need.
    2 points
  14. Hi Folks, Long time no post, busy with child rearing. :-) I do stop by to read up on new posts and topics. I ran across this video on YouTube yesterday, sorry to post if everyone has already seen it but it was good to see and I wanted to share with all. Cheers!
    2 points
  15. It is currently admitted that the MZ-RH1 has the best DAC, ergo the best sound. I prefer however the sound of QS and ES Sony decks.
    2 points
  16. Hi all! So I've started a little project for myself. Minidisc never really caught on too well in canada so I won't be stmbling on any racks at the thrift shop anytime soon. I've been looking for storage solutions, haven't been a big fan of the wine box idea, generally I haven't seen anything that really caught my eye. For some reason it never dawned on me in the last year to 3D print some racks... I'm not sure why, I've been 3D printing everything else for years.... So I designed these up yesterday with some spare time. They're very rough still and very utilitarian. The larger one holds 10 discs and is meant to stack vertically (and has holes for nesting feet, and holes for screws). The smaller one to the right I haven't tested yet but I am thinking of a wall unit that makes the discs look like they are floating out of the wall. Edit wise I'm going to shrink the width by 2mm and perhaps put the discs at a slight downard angle rather than 90 degree so that if they were on an uneven surface, they'd still stay in the rack. What do you guys think? Feel free to toss any ideas my way! (also, for curiosity sake, the larger one took 8 hours to print! 3d printing is pretty cool but it's still a very slow process.) (The render) and printed
    2 points
  17. I got the drivers installed on my computer. I recommend watching this youtube video thats how i did it.
    2 points
  18. In case anyone is interested... I´ve written a review of the Sony MZ-R 50. http://marlene-d.blogspot.de/2013/07/the-legendary-sony-mz-r-50-review.html
    2 points
  19. I just wanted to say that it is nice to have some new members who are clearly MD lovers around to join in on the discussion and add new thoughts, ideas and opinions. Welcome all. :-)
    2 points
  20. Buy LIP-4 battery. First open all the cover of LIP-4. then you can small PCB. just remove the PCB using soldering iron or else. Do the same things with LIP-3 batteries. take the small PCB from LIP-3 and put to LIP-4 battery cell use soldering iron. Then cover you new battery, make sure it won't have electronics shortcuts. You'll have a new long lasting battery. It works on my MZ-N10.
    2 points
  21. I have a Sony MDS-JE780 for sale. It is silver and in mint condition as it has been hardly used. It is based in Wolverhampton so can be collected, or can be posted at additional cost. (I estimate about £7 with recorded delivery) £80 ono. Spec taken from the Sony website: Hybrid Pulse D/A Converter ATRAC DSP Type-S Long Time Recording and Playback (LP2, LP4) Pitch Control Scale Factor Edit NetMD Control A1 Keyboard Terminal 1 x Optical & 1 x Coaxial Input & 1 x Optical Output Available inblack and silverSee the link for more info.... http://www.sony.co.u...=TechnicalSpecs
    2 points
  22. MiniDisc is not useless; it's obsolete. There is a key difference. Nothing as multifaceted as a MiniDisc recorder can be said to be useless. That said, I think that even if Sony had marketed MiniDisc successfully, it would be obsolescent today because its competitors are more feature-rich. I have difficulty following some of the logic in this thread. MiniDisc and MP3 players both have shuffle functions. It's up to the user whether or not to use them, and absolutely nothing about an MP3 player compels one to do so. It SHOULD go without saying that either is just as capable of playing entire albums chronologically. You're arguing against your perceptions of MP3 users' supposed preferences, which are likely exaggerated and unfounded. The issue was the native functionality of the devices and which better suited the questioner. I still have my MiniDisc players, though I almost exclusively use my MP3 player (and never on shuffle). I may be returning to reporting soon and thus would use my MiniDisc to record, even though my MP3 player has a voice recorder. I also take out MiniDisc sometimes just for nostalgia. Whereas many of you are exalting album listening, I actually got into MiniDisc because it facilitated playlists, but now MP3 players do this better because the track need not be re-uploaded to form the playlist. Album listening has its advantages and purposes, but playlists demonstrate the user's creativity and make for great time travel. In my moments of nostalgia, I can call up playlists of the songs that defined eras I miss. It's a beautiful thing. One of you said you found MP3 players useless because they could not do all the things a MiniDisc player could. That depends on the MP3 player. (Further, it's a bogus statement because any mass storage device that plays music clearly has a twofold desirable purpose.) I actually can edit titles and move files on the go, but let's be honest: It is rare that such an act is of such pressing import that it can't wait until one gets home. My MP3 player is an Archos 5, which, like many MP3 players, has great sound quality, radio, a 250-gigabyte hard drive, a voice recorder, Wi-FI, Web radio and TV, DVR, picture display, and video. Useless because it's an MP3 player? Oh, brother. Much of this stems from your zeal to vindicate the MiniDisc, which I love. Another example is the citation of an intangible such as "cool factor," which lies in the eye of the beholder. Consider that being in the in-crowd like an Apple user can be said to be cool. Also, cool as in different just means anything opposed to the leading product, and that doesn't necessarily mean a MiniDisc. A lesser-known MP3 player can turn heads, but turning heads is not where the joy in product use lies. It is also flawed logic to assert that one likes MiniDisc because one prefers to carry around just a few albums. One can choose to listen to just a few on an MP3 player, first of all. The mere presence of all the other tracks you have neatly stored on the hard drive will not weigh heavily on the mind. Second, both MP3 players and MiniDiscs are mass storage devices. That's like one compulsive overeater defaming another because the other is even worse. That does not make you the icon of restraint; rather, you prefer a lesser example of excess. I do believe there still are real advantages to MiniDisc that relate to its native functionality. It's durable, sounds great, and records. It edges out MP3 in battery life, line-in recording, and usually voice recording. Actually, recording is where its greatest strength is now. Another strength is that different models are tailored to different uses; some have radio, some record and others have a digital amplifier, for instance. I love that my MP3 player works with Windows Media Player, which keeps track of the tracks you have and have not added to the device. Syncing automatically adds the new tracks. If I went back to MinDisc, I'd have to guess where I left off as I tried to upload all the music I have purchased since then to MiniDiscs. Also, I don't have to be bothered with SonicStage or ATRAC anymore, and I am glad. I don't have a second-generation Hi-MD player, so I can't put MP3s on them.
    2 points
  23. I have an N510 and a DN430. Both sound really good. I also have some S1's which, I know, are type R. They both sound excellent to me. I figured I'd take the (possible) slight noise quality hit and lack of remote for bombproof (especially in Orygun) performance of the S1. I can say those DN430's sound just fine. I think you can find that model with a radio too
    2 points
  24. Well, you might not consider them "pro" @Richard, but they certainly look very professional to me. And your pictorial posts are always very much appreciated.
    1 point
  25. After half year I have some new ideas about upgrading and extending functionality of SONY NAC-HD1. I started two projects. The first one, upgrading NAC-HD1 software, kernel, kernel modules, system libraries to the newest one, taken from NAS-S55HDE GigaJuke (software is one of the latest for Juke's and includes additional features and bugfixes) and kernel.org. Some modules are rebuilt. Personally thanks to Joe from Germany for exchanging hard drive image taken from NAS-S55HDE. Project outlines: Status What actually works: *Linter database *Analog In *FM/AM tuner *Spectrum analyzer *Wireless Network connectivity *Wired Network connectivity *Cd ripping to Linear PCM *Cd ripping to mp3 *Gracenote DB *Artist / Album / Track / Genre / Folder library *Can quickly search Artist during playback (disadvantage for NAC-HD1E original software) *Import audio through networl / external usb storage *System boots *Plays mp3 / atrac3 / atrac3 Plus / Linear PCM (OMG AUDIO FORMAT) *DLNA client *DLNA server *Party mode client *Party mode server *Timer *Screen saver *USB mounting *X-Dj mode including analysis (new features added after upgrade). *All front panel buttons. Things that actually doesn't work: *Cd Ripping to Atrac3 / Atrac3 Plus (NAS-S55HDE doesn't have support for ATRAC as Sony starting year 2008 closed it's OMGAUDIO / ATRAC musc store www.connect.com), I started implementation to get it working. It can take some time. *Digital in (Coax and Optical) (NAS-S55HDE doesn't have support to Digital Coax and Optical, now Sony uses DMPort), this one I'll also get to work on. I'll also want to implemnt DMPort. *Cannot turn on device if in "quick power off" mode by pressing powe on button both on device and remote control. Can turn only pressing apropriate functional button (HDD,CD,FM,Home media, etc.). Principialy this is just a bug, no problems to resolve it. The second one consists of upgrading system RAM, resoldering (reballing) two BGA 90 ball (pin) SDRAM chipsets. Actualy chips are ordered and it seems that till January I get them. Then do soldering operation with high precision equipment. As described previous post , NAC-HD1 has a small amount of RAM memory, it's based on SH4 Renesas embedded cpu architecture. Uses only 64MB (megabytes) of RAM. RAM is organized by two 256Mbit chips in sum 512Mbits that equals to 64MB of memory. As the system turns / boots on Linux, the kernel takes amount of memory at startup to load all necessary drivers to control Jukebox and dedicated memory for this kernel is too small and not enough, but if we take from shared memory, then application left a small piece of memory (especially after software upgrade) to load Linter database, DLNA Server, main Tiger application, Sj3 server, system logging, ssh daemon, network stack (ipv4 connectivity), etc. Upgrading RAM to 128MB is MAX possible for this device, cause of architecture limitations. As I got full set of original SONY circuits for this device, studied tgrough, I decided to upgrade RAM. Originally 64MB is quite enough till you have 20 000 of music, then all system freezes and the make people nervous Outlines Name / Status Functional analysis - Completed Chips for replacement - Completed Ordering chips - Completed Getting chipsets - ????? Chipset approval - ????? Preparing for soldering - ???? Resoldering - ????? Memory testing - ???? System testing - ???? Benefits after system upgrade: DLNA Audio server (DLNA as is, DLNA for Wireless Audio systems such as NAS-C5E where can use x-Dj function, no need to speacilly install DLNA server for audio sharring on home computer) Party mode (can simultaniously play audio from library on 5 devices through network) Faster system (not so frequent memory swapping with hard drive during operation, that makes freeze and delay) Comfortable audio searching, better to search music with remote, don't need to enter Folder mode, that previously offered searching option. Support for newer wireless network cards X-Dj additional mood channels and more accurate audio analysis.
    1 point
  26. Good evening gentlemen! If you're in the rather tricky position of losing recording ability on your MD unit, your warrantee's run out, and you're out of luck paying for an extravagent overhaul by sony tech, I might have the solution for you. Although this is my first post, I've been a lurker of these forums for quite some time after buying my first MD unit (R700) a year and a half ago. During this time I've ran through a R900, and now currently using a N1. Recently a friend of mine lost recording capability on his N1 imported from japan. Since it was an import, sony tech started playing games with respect to how much they'd charge to get the unit fixed (in Toronto any way). So he turned to me for help. From what I've seen on these forums, this recording problem always crops up from time to time, and at first I was jaded by the number of complaints in the absence of any sort of helpful info, aside from the lazy lines, "bring it back to get it serviced". Please! The following guide describes how I managed to fix an N1 with the supposedly common "recording" or "blankdisc" problem. I will not guarentee anything; this article is intended as a final option to an otherwise broken MD. ~~~ Notes before we begin: 1. This is intended as a last resort attempt to correct recording problems. You will be making irreversable 'adjustments' to your unit. 2. You will need a certain basic competancy in electronics; ie: be able to spot a broken wire, and not be intimidated by some basic basic soldering. Knowing common vocabulary also helps 3. You will need to take your MD apart, which necessarily voids your warranty. Do this at your own risk! 4. You must work methodically as well as have a sharp eye for details when dissecting your MD. If you cannot take apart your MD and put it back together, don't read further. 5. Find a pair of non-working headphones (that are headed for the trash) or buy the most inexpensive headphones at a local dollar store (we will be using the wires from them). 6. Patience. Don't be surprised if you find it doesn't work perfectly the first time (took me two weeks off and on). 7. Read this over before you attempt anything. Visualize the flow of work and make sure you know what you're doing before picking up that soldering iron! ~~~ Abstract: (for people who know what their MD looks like internally, and want to get to the point) The ribbon cable that services the magnetic write head of the N1 is prone to breaking, as the magnetic head is coupled to the optical head (so even playback will stress the cable). The solution is to bypass the broken ribbon cable with wires, allowing signals to once again reach the write head. The key aspect is the choice of wire used for the bypass; it must be extremely thin and very flexible, to reduce contributing any mechanical resistence to the lateral movement of the read/write heads as they traverse the disc surface. Single conductor wires will not do the job as they offer too much resistence, preventing the read/write heads from traversing the entire range from the inner to the outer edge of a disc. Use the wire scavenged/scuttled from inexpensive earphones for this task, as they are very thin multi conductor wires with a fibre core, and also insulated via coating [?]. ~~~ We will begin with a diagnosis of your problem. I'm working with the N1 for simplicity and knowledge sake (as I've fixed only the N1 so far). 1. Functional Unit: Is your MD able to play recorded discs? If not then you've got bigger problems that I can't solve. 2. Make sure it is a problem with recording: Is your unit able to record via microphone input? (as opposed to problems transferring if using NetMD software). If so, you're having software problems, which is not my focus in this thread. If not, read on! 3. Cleaning: Some times problems can be resolved by cleaning the optical head. Use a cotton swap and some cleaning fluid (not water!). Personally I used rubbing alcohol as it works well with fingerprints and dust. I hope others will correct me or suggest alternatives if you're well acquainted with cleaning solutions. Test to see if the problem persists. 4a. Dissection: Download the service manual for your MD model (if you can) and follow the diagrams to remove the outer shell of the unit. For most Sony models, the casing is a two piece design; the bottom segment covers the circuitry board and battery, while the top consists of the operative buttons while serving to protect the recording head. Following the service manual steps should let you take apart the casing easily. Remember for the N1 (and similar), the battery cover must go first, then the bottom casing, then the top. Note: 'Open' the MD (as in popping it open like you were going to insert a disc), remove battery cover, then remove bottom casing. You should see a ribbon cable that runs from the top casing connected to the circuit board via a special 'connector'. Remove the screws securing the top casing, and flip it over so you can see the inside of the MD, while keeping the ribbon cable attached. The ribbon cable is anchored to the board via a flat 'connector'. The 'connector' is a two piece construct; you can release the cable by pulling softly on the two sides of the connector segment facing the ribbon. Do not, do not tug on the ribbon cable itself. If you find the ribbon difficult to detach, it means you havn't released the connector yet. Don't go any further if you can't pass this step, undo everything and take it to the sony dealer. Sony's portable MD recorder designs are relatively universal. You should be able to identify the optical lens head, attached to the motors and the axle that allows it to track the disc. This (to the best of my knowledge) is similar to a cd player optical head, so no surprises. The optical head is on the 'bottom' of the unit, and stays horizontal even when you open the case for inserting discs. You should also notice the magnetic write head, attached to a metal arm that is fixed to the 'top' of the interior chasis, which can move up and down to accomodate insertion of discs. Take care in not touching the metal arm or the magnetic write head. 4b. Test Reattach the battery clip, and insert the gumstick battery. Close battery cover to secure battery. Your view of your opened MD should be birds-eye, with the chasis popped up as if accepting a disc. Insert a disc with content in it. Preferably a full disc. Make sure it is write protected. Instead of pushing down on the left chasis arm to 'load the disc', you can detach the left chasis arm (by pulling it gently to the left farther), and let the chasis , along with the disc, drop into the loaded position. Get something to keep the right chasis arm down (as it activates a switch that tells the unit the cover is closed, allowing you to turn it on). You should be able to turn on and play the disc using the controls on the top casing, while being able to see the disc spin and the magnetic head track across the disc surface. Pay attention to how high it floats above the disc (vertical distance) Stop the player, and remove whatever you used to close the right chasis arm switch (let the arm lift up). The unit should turn off by now as it thinks you opened the case to pop a disc out. The disc itself won't pop out as you've released the left chasis arm that helps lift the disc out. You must lift the chasis yourself and remove the disc. Replace with an empty or expendable disc, and once again load it (using steps above). Try to record to the disc (you don't need any input), while paying close attention to the magnetic write head. Make detailed observations regarding the vertical distance of the head relative to the disc. You will need to refer to it further on. It is closer to the disc surface when you are recording than when you are in playback. Eject the disc once again, and remove the battery, detaching the ribbon cable from the top casing, put the top casing somewhere safe. 5. Identifying the source of the problem: At this point the problem should be apparent. There is a ribbon cable that connects the magnetic read head, runs through the flexible metal arm, and traces a path to the circuit board on the bottom, where it is soldered at two points to the board. This cable is easily broken, and this should be your problem, if you find a broken cable. If you've got keen eyesight you should also notice that the magnetic write head has only two leads (wires)!, and also the magnetic head + arm construct is intimately connected to the optical head/block, so that the magnetic head moves in unison with the optical head. Since the magnetic head is coupled (intimately attached) with the optical head, the ribbon cable servicing the magnetic head is always under use, even when you're not recording anything (ie: during simple playback). This is the exact problem. At this point it is obvious what steps must be taken to fix the problem. Simply bypass the broken ribbon cable and you should be fine, right? 6. The broken cable: At first I tried using liquid solder (comes in a pen, you can 'draw' solder lines with it) to patch up the ribbon cable, but it doesn't work well. It seems the ribbon cable consists of a paper-like 'base' or substrate, with very thin copper wire (they're flat so i'm supposing that these wires are printed onto the substrate) deposited on top, finally covered with a protective and flexible polymer/plastic. I must admit it is an elegent design, as well as a major pain to replace. This is the toughest step; replacing the ribbon cable. You must find wiring that is very very thin, yet very flexible and pliable. Even the smallest gauge wires you can find in 'surplus' stores will not do the job. Do not use single conductor insulated wires (wires with only a single copper wire insulated with plastic), even if they are extremely thin, as they are not flexible enough to do the job (yes they may feel very flexible in your hands however). The motor mechanism that drives the motion of the optical/magnetic head (not the disc motor) is very sensitive to resistance; it is so sensitive that single conductor wires will provide enough mechanical resistance to prevent the heads from moving/tracking far at all (more on this later). I has taken me a month of trial and error before realizing the best wires for the job are the multi conductor wires within cheap headphones work best for this situation. Most cheap earphones (using the earbud types as an example) have two wires originating from the stereo plug, one wire for each ear. Cut the plug off, and split the two wires. You only need a wire length equivalent to the distance covered by the original ribbon cable, so save the rest for other odd jobs i suppose (don't forget to leave a little margin, in case). Strip the wires and you should see that each 'wire' servicing the earbuds actually consist of two very thin and fragile wires, each wrapped around a fiber core. Generally the copper wires are 'ground' and the coloured wires (red and blue) carry the signal. You can use any of them; I decided to go with the red and blue just for simplicity in wiring. Prepare the wires by applying very very little amuont of solder to one end. I suggest dipping the end in flux, then melt the solder so it flows onto the wire. Very little solder is needed. You don't want the solder to 'weight down' the magnetic head. 7. Bypassing the ribbon cable: Attaching wires to existing ribbon cable is a difficult process and can be 'hit and miss' as the printed wiring beneath the plastic sheath is rather thin. You might just burn through the ribbon too. Here's another tricky part: Make a detailed note of the vertical position the metal arm is when at rest (floating above the optical head). Chances are you will bend the arm out of the original shape when you're working with it. The arm must be at a certain position in order to be able to record. Too close to the disc and you will scratch it. Too far from the disc surface and you will lose recording ability. Carefully detach the metal arm that carries the magnetic head from the rest of the MD by removing the single screw that secures it. It will be difficult as it is also glued down. Take your time and be careful, using a fitting screwdriver (I used a flat head rather than the philips (cross) as flat heads don't strip the thread as easily - your preference) and making sure you don't strip the screw. Remember the shape of the arm! Once you've detached the arm, look at the bottom side. You will see two relatively large solder points where the magnetic write head is wired to the ribbon cable. I soldered the two headphone wires to these points (existing solder at these points should be enough to accomodate the wires). Make sure you don't create a short circuit (check for solder bridging). Secure the soldered wires by threading them though the holes of the metal arm (don't worry, the ribbon cable is useless to you now). Let the wires trail same path the ribbon cable used to take. They should be long enough to allow the read/write heads to reach the outer edge of a disc, but not too long that it gets cluttered up when the read/write heads return to the inner areas of a disc, as clutter will cause resistance and that will hamper read/write head movement. Cut any excess wire, and prepare and solder the other end to the points on the circuit board where the ribbon cable was anchored. Take note of which wire solders to which point from tracing the paths taken by each wire within the ribbon cable. (this is simple, you shouldn't mix it up at all given only two wires!) Reform the original shape of the metal arm (if you've bent it, which you should have avoided), and reattach the arm back to the MD. Make sure it is not skewed (should be perfectly in line) and tightly screwed back in as you don't want any misalignment. Check the vertical distance of the arm to make sure it is floating at the same height as it was before you detached it. This is crucial. 8. Testing: Your MD should be fixed by now, but we want to make sure. Reattach the ribbon cable of the top casing (the casing with the play/rec controls), but keep the cover loose (don't screw it in). Be careful not to break this ribbon cable (haha!) Reinsert the gumstick battery. Close battery cover to secure battery. Your view of your opened MD should be birds-eye, with the chasis popped up as if accepting a disc. Insert a disc with content in it. Preferably a full disc. Make sure it is write protected. You should be able to turn on and play the disc using the controls on the top casing, while being able to see the disc spin and the magnetic head track across the disc surface. Try playing some tracks now, especially try to play track 1 (close to inner area of disc), then jumping straight to the last song (which should be at the outer edge of the disc, assuming you didn't move any tracks). You should have no problems with the read/write heads tracking from inner to outer edge of the disc. If you do, it means your wires are causing too much resistence (which means you're using too thick wires! redo it with thinner, more flexible wires). Stop the player, and replace with an empty or expendable disc, and once again load it (using steps above). Now test by recording from mic-in. Keen observers will notice the magnetic write head arm will be lowered closer to the surface of the disc when recording. Play back to see if you've managed to record anything. If not, retrace your prior soldering and wiring steps and see if you missed any details. At this point, the most critical detail (aside from obvious wiring connectivity mistakes), is the vertical distance the magnetic head floats above the disc when recording. Make sure it lies the same vertical distance from the disc surface when recording as it did during your initial test before the bypass. Once you've managed to get it to record and playback audio from the mic-in, you've sucessfully repaired your MD! 9. Reassembling Remove the discs, and reclip the left chasis arm with the chasis. Secure the top casing first, making sure you don't crush your new wires. Remove the battery and the battery cover, so you can reattach the bottom casing. Take care when reattaching the bottom casing, as you've got to fit the hold switch on the bottom face as well as the 'open' switch (to open the shell for discs). You won't be able to fit the bottom casing snugly without being able to fit the hold and open switches as well. Reattach battery cover and put back all the screws you took out (should be 9 screws in total). Power the unit up and do one more recording test on it using mic-in, then try downloading songs through the cradle. Done! I hope this long article will help those of you out there stuck with a broken recorder. Good luck! Update: The N1 I fixed a week back lost recording ability once again after spending a long, hot day in my backpack while I was out hiking. You may run into intermittent problems when the MD has experienced a temperature change. I solved this issue by reopening the top cover and gently pushing the flexible write head arm down towads the optical head several times ("flexing" it), so it would acheive tighter floating distance to the disc when recording, and problem was solved! Note that in order to push it down, you've got to have the chasis 'lowered', so detach the left chasis arm first, or else the metal construct that holds the MD disc will prevent the write head from behing pushed down; you need to flex it so that it can almost touch the optical head. You don't need to flex too much, a slight 1/4 mm adjustment is enough. When you're done flexing, just make sure the head isn't scratching the disc by testing recording while the top cover is still removed, but with ribbon cable still attached so you can control the unit) As an aside, if you've read through the service manuals for most sony units, there's a section on temperature calibration in service mode. I believe that serves the same purpose; namely to reposition the vertical distance of the write head when temperature change affects the metal arm. Interesting stuff! Update #2: Mag. Write-head must be in contact with the disc surface. To avoid skipping issues when recording, clean both sides of the disc. You may also want to quickly wipe the bottom 'contact surface' of the mag.head as well, with a cotton tip, as I've found grime buildup there that lifted the mag.head, hence no contact. Be careful though! Update #3: Ressurecting an old post, if you have problems where the unit blanks the disc and makes it unreadable (and hence unformattable by sonicstage), there is a dirty hack to manually format the disc. Don't do this if you have no idea how to navigate service mode or understand the implications of a mis-executed hack. So far, I know it works on my N1, and has been reported to work on the N710. 1. Get into service mode: set (hold) on; hold down (vol -); >, >, <, <, >, <, >, <, (pause), (pause). 2. access [AUTOCOM 500] using (vol +), enter using (play). 3. access [510 ACCESS] using (play). 4. starting at [511 xxSCC], move to [518 xxS03] using (>). 5. change S03 to S00 using (vol +/-), so the value reads [518 xxS00]. 6. press (stop) to execute. 7. disc mechanism should be heard rattling. 8. exit service mode by removing power. voila, the corrupted disc should be blanked. info thanks to leorick original post here
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  27. Hello everyone, this is my first post in this forum... I've recently discovered that the BCA-NWHD3 adapter that came with the Sony NW-HD3 player can also be used with Sony MZ-N10 NetMD player. Both devices have the same proprietary port for data transfer and charging. All you need to do is to cut a piece of plastic that supports the adapter when connecting to the device (I used my Dremel tool to cut it; very easy stuff). Then you can attach the adapter to MZ-N10 and use a regular mini USB cable to connect the MD player to your computer. You can also charge the player via DC-in jack with an auxiliary AC-DC adapter. I use a 5V Sony PSP power adapter by the way; it works flawlessly for charging MZ-N10. Unfortunately, you cannot attach the BCA-NWHD3 adapter to the charging cradle. Because of the plastic housing, it doesn't fit into the cradle. Hope this information may help someone who is searching for a "hard to find" USB cable for MZ-N10... Here are some photos:
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  28. I was fortunate enough to spot a BCA-MZNH1 stand when it appeared on eBay at the weekend and snapped it up - I have uploaded a photo that confirms that the NH1 definitely requires 6V. I also tested my power supply with a multi-meter and it is delivering 6.15V but not sure what current is being delivered as the multi-voltage adapter delivers 3-12V max 1.2A. The end result is the same though, the charge light comes on for almost 20 seconds and then goes off (as does the display on the NH1) - I left it on the stand overnight with power connected but still no life from the battery so Jimma's battery re-build is looking the more likely solution as NGY's method is a bit above my technical experience. One final thing I can try (but I am not expecting the outcome to be any different) in a few days as I was lucky enough to win a job lot of HD1s on eBay that includes a Sony AC-ES608K (6V 800mA) power supply. That bundle should arrive early next week and, in the meantime, I will continue periodically tying to initiate a charge cycle on the NH1 as I have know some smartphones that have been caught in a re-charge loop when they have not been used in a while and the battery has been almost completely discharged and then suddenly contains enough charge to begin a full charge cycle.
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  29. I've encountered this. Sorry for the bump thread, mods, I'm not sure if it's a forum faux pas, as I've not posted for well over a decade. The MZ-N10 I bought new (about 2002 maybe), had this problem a few months after purchase. I sent it back under warranty to have it fixed, it came back, then after over a year of use the same thing happened, this time out of warranty. If I remember correctly MD recorder was sent back with the repair notes which stated the mainboard had been changed. A few months ago I decided to dig out my MD recorders after frequenting r/minidisc on Reddit, and see if they worked. By some miracle the battery on the N10 still worked (as did the battery on my mint MZ-NH1), despite neither being used since 2006, so I have been playing around with them ever since. I am able to transfer music to my NH1 in NetMD mode, but can't with the same PC, driver, cabling to the N10, it briefly flashes PC--MD on the screen when unplugging cable, but that's all, that applies connecting directly to the unit or through the dock. So it's possible the chip that governs USB connectivity in my N10 is faulty; that's my take on it.
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  30. I'm wayyy off topic here, but if you like my waffle... These days (since early 1990s) we do the logic design with specialised software languages like SystemVerilog or VHDL, generally known as Hardware Description Languages or HDLs. This description can't be "anything and everything" you like in these languages, you have to use particular constructs in particular contexts to "infer" meaningful structures like combinational logic or flip-flops (an abstraction we call Register Transfer Level, or RTL). Then we use a process called logic synthesis which converts the HDL description into a logic netlist (AND, OR, NAND, NOR gates, flip-flops etc). This logical netlist then has to be "layed out" onto silicon by taking the transistors of each gate and mapping them onto silicon and defining the layers that are needed in the silicon (wells, channels, contacts), then these transistors have to be wired together by creating metal interconnects that join silicon contact to silicon contact in the required circuit topology. We also have to add power meshes and clock distribution networks and fix the timing of the circuit (setup and hold). Once the physical design is complete and the layout meets all of the logical and physical design rules, the design can be sent to the silicon foundry at a point we call "tape out". The foundry do the magic chemistry steps to actually fabricate our design onto a silicon wafer. Then there is test and packaging assembly and a whole load of qualification testing to be done before the device can be released as a production part. This is a design cycle that is typically between 1 and 3 years depending on the complexity and size of the design. That's an extremely brief and simplified overview, but I'm sure you could google for more detail! Back to FSMs we wouldn't usually (ever?) use a ROM style implementation on a custom chip, we'd use an HDL to infer "random logic" to build the next-state logic. The ROM method used in the project you are looking at is a clever way to implement "random logic" in one off-the-shelf chip - couple it with a bank of flip-flops (like IC9) and you have yourself the building blocks for your FSM. The clever bit now is to work out the ROM contents which is how you define the logic of your FSM and hence its function/behaviour. There are a couple of flavours of FSM, Moore and Mealy. These terms describe how the state and outputs are a function of the inputs (Moore -> outputs are only a function of the current state, Mealy -> outputs are a function of the current state and the current inputs). Your copy-bit killer is probably a Mealy machine (the output SPDIF flop stage is not part of your FSM state because it doesn't feed back into the EPROM). Anyway that's enough from me for one night!
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  31. i much prefer the character of the 2nd device. the bass is better defined and the sound feels more vast. i think its clearer too.
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  32. Ok what langauges can you speak/read? What languages do you know? If you could learn/speak any langauge at all, what would it be? To start the ball rolling, I know: * English (you don't say!) * German (Well, I should know it... I did it at school for 6 years, but hardly use it that often) * Also a bit of Latin, which will come in handy once time travel has been perfected. I would love to know: * Arabic, French, Japanese, Spanish & Hindi. What do you know? And by the way, just so someone can't be smart, langauges such as HTML, Java, php, C, etc don't count, at least not for the purposes of this thread, but artifical languages such as Esperanto and Klingon do.
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  33. The folks at MiniDisc Access have just received a new shipment of clear "flip-style" minidisc jewel cases.
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  34. Jim if you are ever reading this...I do hope you get better soon plus I know you have got 1 million and one things to do with your new work-shop when your health back.I do appreciated your time thanks. Jim if you are ever reading this...I do hope you get better soon plus I know you have got 1 million and one things to do with your new work-shop when your health back.I do appreciated your time thanks.
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  35. Hey guys i just wanted to share something I found yesterday. i have been looking for a way to neatly store my somewhat large collection of minidiscs. as you know there weren't many options to begin with and today there are even less as most have been bought up. to add insult to injury, i no longer have any of the protective cases that came with my Minidiscs so most of the regular solutions wouldn't really work for me anyway. then i found this: http://www.reallyusefulproducts.co.uk/usa/html/onlineshop/rub/b00_3litreOrg.php (updated link Jan-21-2014) thanks sfbp here is the UPC: you can fit 16 MDs tall without cases. they will also fit sideways with the cases! (but i dont know how many) total you can fit 256 MDs without cases in this arrangement! hope this help someone out. they literally fit perfect in this thing and you will have 16 lil organizer boxes left over to store and organize other random whatnot.
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  36. I prefer the gumsticks (NH-14WM and look-a-likes) (MZ-RH910, MZ-N1 and MZ-N910), I have 8 of them and always some of them are charged. Sometimes I use AA (MZ-NH600 and MZ-NH700). I dislike most the LIP-4WM, short live and very costly to buy a new one. But replaceble is always better then build-in as is the case with my mp3-players.
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  37. Unfortunately most charity shops these days (or certainly the major ones) have somebody knowledgeable picking through stuff like vinyl records, CD's etc. Anything that appears to be worth a bit then gets listed on Ebay. You might find something in a small, local, independent charity shop or occasionally stuff turns up at car boots. There's a lot of luck involved. I believe there was a thread some time ago discussing pre-recorded MD's and which Atrac version was used. I've got a pre-recorded copy of Meat Loaf's Bat Out Of Hell album and I must admit the sound quality is nowhere near that of the CD. I haven't actually tried this but I reckon if I copied the CD onto a blank MD using my deck (in SP mode) the copy would sound better than the pre-recorded one.
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  38. From what I've seen on ebay and from what I have sold, the MZ-NH600D seems to be the cheapest Hi-MD recorder. I would check craigslist if you want to buy for $20-$30. If you are going to use Ebay, expect to pay $50 and above. I've sold 2 of these recorders on ebay for an average of $90 each. Hope that helps.
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  39. AVLS (Automatic Volume Limiter System) is there to control the volume, so to protect your hearing. Maybe you record in a MDLP mode with your new player, then try to listen on your old "SP only" player ?
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  40. Hi Matt, Welcome to the forum. Before I answer it bothers me that you're spelling "obsolete" wrong. Now that is out the way: Aw man, I was kinda hoping you were serious about the "stuck in the past" thing, I was just about to sharpen my pitchfork - no doubt along with my fellow MDers. :-) What is YOUR attraction to the (now technically obselete) format, Minidisc? I used to be a big user and evangelist of the format. My attraction now is part "train set" effect, part fed-up with mp3 players and part nostalgia. Truth be told, I also like being different and retro, if everyone has an iPod I DO NOT want one. I also like creating compendiums of new music. I normally build up a playlist on my PC (where I listen to all my music these days) until I have ~2h 30mins of tracks "favourited". Then I record them to an MD in real-time for playback now and again. 1. How old were you when you first 'bought into' the format? 25 or so. 2. Do you still regularly use your very first player? No it was sold. I have re-bought exactly same spec as primary unit. 3. Do you regularly 'use' your items, or are some purely of interest as a 'collector'? Bit of both. 4. Do you listen to 'new' music on your discs, or prefer to keep the format for music 'of the era'? Bit of both. 5. Do you own more items than you can 'practically use'? Guilty as charged. 6. Did you 'go away' from MiniDisc', only to return to it at a later date? I did. 7. Do you associate use of your player with 'fond memories', or is it a purely 'practical' consideration? Bit of both. (the question/answer format shows me you really are a Police officer :-) Questions for you: will you share your conclusions with us? Will it be made public? Who else are you asking?
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  41. Danny (Slugbahr) & I have quite a few sealed discs for sale. Either fully sealed or new discs from multipacks that have been removed from their packets. Lots of Sony Neige, Prism & a few Bianca's. Maxell Twinkle 5-packs or Axia Slim packs. TDK MJ's, Axia 'Select Your Style' 5-packs, Axia J'z etc. Also got some sealed Prime Discs as well. I've listed some Axia 'Lego' discs on this forum but no-one was interested. So in the end I listed them on eBay. Something I'd rather not do as I hate paying eBay 10% of the sale and then the PayPal fee on top, but it seems the only way to sell things these days. We're based in Australia and maybe people get put off with paying $13 (USA) - $17(Europe) for postage for a 500g package, yet that's about the same price I'd have to pay to get a similar package sent out of the US or UK these days. If you're after less generic discs then they are harder to come by these days. The sellers of rare discs on eBay seems to have dried up. Even in the last few years the amount of rare discs around are less. Some discs you may never see for sale (e.g. Benetton, Kenwood etc). Maybe you can find some old collectors who can sell you some spares...
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  42. Good to see people coming to (or back to) the MD scene. There's life in the old format yet! Still using mine on a regular basis.
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  43. -Considering whether to explore repairing or not - I have two NH900s, both of which have started failing in the same way that 'sbeuh' describes above during playback of 74 and 80 minute discs recorded in SP or LP2. Skips and gaps are becoming much too common. They worked fine when I first got them. I'm wondering if it's worth having these two units repaired? I liked them as playback units and for downloading or burning CDs to using Simple Burner. I'd rather use these units for such functions than my RH1s. But, I have also found them to be finicky machines (especially regarding the two buttons on the face labeled 'CANCEL / CHG' which also has the Pause (||) function and the smaller button labeled 'NAVI /MENU'. (I have a third NH900 that is beyond repair I think, which could be used for spare parts but, it did lot of skipping and blanking out during playback as well.) Were these just poorly designed or built machines, despite the nice metal case? Or did I just manage to get three bad ones? To repair or not to repair is the question.
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  44. Hello and welcome archmonde11, Regarding your questions about MD/HiMD formatting. You are correct, this is a choice of the format placed on the disc. The original MD format using MDLP (ATRAC3 CODEC compression options) was designed for storage of 80 minutes of music at 292Kbps (SP mode) very good sound quality, but limited duration and capacity, 160 minutes of music at 132Kbps (LP2 mode) decent sound quality but with compression artifacts being more obvious or 320 minutes of music at 66Kbps (LP4 mode) so-so sound quality, not acceptable to some. With HiMD, you are able to place the HiMD format on an older 80 minute disc, the HiMD format allows for the storage of higher duration of source material. The comparison is not apples to apples because Sony began stating the capacity of a disc in MB or GB versus minutes of storage space. An 80 minute disk prepared with HiMD format has access to the newer ATRAC3plus compression options as well as the original ATRAC3 options. Using ATRAC3 you can store approximately 5 hours LP2 and 10 hours LP4, using the newer ATRAC3plus CODECs for compression, an 80 minute disc prepared with HiMD format can store approximately 2 hours 30 minutes of 256Kbps (Hi-SP), 10 hours of 64Kbps (Hi-LP). There are some other ATRAC3plus CODEC options as well, however some cannot be transferred to MD regardless of the format placed on the disk. Using a 1GB HiMD disc, which can only be formatted using the HiMD format, you can store many more hours of ATRAC3 and ATRAC3Plus content. The disc is has roughly 3.25 times the capacity of an 80 minute disc and can hold around 8 hours of ATRAC3plus 256Kbps (HiSP) which is great. It can also store around 16 hours of ATRAC3 132Kbps (LP2). PCM can be stored on both disk types as well, although at the cost of capacity. An 80 minute HiMD formatted disc can store around 30 minutes of PCM, a 1GB HiMD disc can store around 94 minutes of PCM. I personally use new old stock 80 Minute MD disks in two modes, optical recording of SP (292Kbps) straight to disc for fantastic sound quality, but only 80 minutes of storage (same as CD). I also frequently use two other combinations of format and CODEC. 80 minute MD prepared with HiMD format using ATRAC3plus HiSP (256Kbps) for about 2.5 hours per disk with great sound quality as well as 80 minute MD prepared with HiMD format using ATRAC3 LP2 (132Kbps) for about 5 hours per disk with decent sound quality. I own around 10 HiMD discs but find that I do not use them often. Have fun figuring it all out, the RH1 is a sweet unit, I love mine and use it nearly every day.
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  45. BTW, has anyone actually tried putting "Her Majesty" into its original place between "Mean Mr. Mustard" and "Polythene Pam"? It sounds perfectly at home there, no matter what Paul McCartney says. Simply inserting the track between the two others may not work - you may need to do a more precise waveform insertion in Adobe Audition. The original place where the tape is spliced can be easily seen.
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  46. Thx for the replies. Is an output of 0.7A for a charger considered high for a Sony battery? I asked this because I've heard somewhere that the charge should be around 200-400 mA.
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